Academic journal article Nursing Education Perspectives

Dreams for the Future for Clinical Simulation

Academic journal article Nursing Education Perspectives

Dreams for the Future for Clinical Simulation

Article excerpt

CLINICAL SIMULATION OFFERS STUDENTS RICH, AUTHENTIC CLINICAL EXPERIENCES IN A SAFE, NONTHREATENING ENVIRONMENT. For one of the first times in education, nurse faculty now provide practice opportunities for students to learn, experiment, and solve problems before being required to perform and care for real patients. Whether the goal is to meet calls for clinical redesign, use technology in the curricula, or promote interdis' ciplinary education as a core essential for health care educators, clinical simulation fills many recognised needs in nursing education.

This special issue of Nursing Education Perspectives comes at an opportune time as nurse educators incorporate simulation into the curriculum and explore new clinical models for nursing education. In this issue, readers will find articles to enrich their teaching practices, discover new teaching approaches using simulation pedagogy, and learn more about selected student learning outcomes when simulation is used.

With an increased emphasis on faculty development, and more federally funded grant opportunities, nurse educators are learning more and more about the use and implementation of simulation. The second NLN grant, funded by Laerdal Medical Corporation, allowed nine simulation experts and eight international contributors to develop webbased courses to teach other educators about simulation design, implementation, and evaluation. In addition, a one-stop shopping website, the Simulation Innovation Resource Center (SIRC), was developed to serve as a resource center for educators using simulation to assist and support their work (http://sirc.nln.org/). These initiatives have greatly increased faculty opportunities to learn about, use, and implement simulation.

What does the future hold for simulation? In the near term, we will see the continuing use of simulation in nursing and health care education. Implementation started slowly, with a few states now allowing up to 25 percent of real clinical time to be accounted for through the use of simulation. Based on evidence and quality outcomes from the use of this pedagogy, simulation could eventually be used for the majority of clinical time in nursing education. We all recognize the problems brought about by decreased numbers of clinical sites, patient safety issues, and the many rules and regulations required by clinical agencies' regulatory bodies and their effect on the amount and quality of education instructors can provide their students. …

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