Academic journal article The Middle East Journal

Chronology: Yemen

Academic journal article The Middle East Journal

Chronology: Yemen

Article excerpt

See also, Regional Affairs, Algeria

1994

July 16: The government sealed off Aden until 24 July to allow aid convoys to distribute food and water, and imposed a daily seven-hour curfew at 10 PM. [7/17 NYT]

July 23: According to Agence France-Presse, government troops fired on protestors in Mukalla, wounding several people. A spokesman denied the claim. [7/25 FBIS]

Up to 150 cases of cholera and 17 deaths had been reported during the period 21-23 July. International Committee of the Red Cross officials were working to restore water, cut off during the war. [7/24 NYT]

July 26: The curfew was lifted on Sanaa and other cities. The Aden-based newspaper 14 October resumed publication after a two-week gap. [7/27 FBIS]

The government freed 4,000 soldiers and officers from the south who had surrendered to the government, declaring a general amnesty for southern soldiers. [7/27 NYT]

July 28: Representatives of the government and former southern officers met for talks sponsored by the UN, led by mediator Lakhdar Brahimi. [7/29 NYT, FBIS]

Aug. 11: President Ali Abdallah Salih announced that the southern-based Yemen Socialist Party (YSP) would only be allowed to participate in the government if it expelled the leaders involved in the war, and called for former vice president and southern president al-Bidh to be extradited from Oman. [8/12 FBIS]

Sept. 3: In Aden, clashes broke out between forces of the Islamic Jihad Organization and government forces, killing 20 people. [9/6 FBIS]

Sept. 6: Ali Salih Abbad Muqbil was elected secretary general of the Yemeni Socialist Party, replacing Ali Salim al-Bidh. [9/7 FBIS]

Sept. 10: Alleged Islamists attacked police stations in Aden, killing ten police. [9/12 FBIS]

Sept. 28: Yemen's parliament adopted a new constitution based on Islamic law, and announced that the president would be elected by direct universal suffrage for a five-year term, and would be given the right to appoint his own vice president. …

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