Academic journal article Journal of Comparative Family Studies

The "Children of Perestroika" Come of Age: Young People of Moscow Talk about Life in the New Russia

Academic journal article Journal of Comparative Family Studies

The "Children of Perestroika" Come of Age: Young People of Moscow Talk about Life in the New Russia

Article excerpt

ADELMAN, Deborah, THE "CHILDREN OF PERESTROIKA" COME OF AGE: Young People of Moscow Talk About Life in the New Russia. New York: M.E. Sharpe Inc., 1994, 216 pp., $16.95 softcover / $30.00

Reviewed by: JULIE V. BROWN*

This book is a follow-up to an earlier volume, The Children of Perestroika (M.E. Sharpe, 1991), in which Adelman presented a set of interviews which she had conducted in 1989 with eleven Moscow teenagers about their lives and their plans for the future. These young people were experiencing all the usual problems of adolescence. In addition they were struggling to find their way into adulthood during the Gorbachev era of perestroika, a time of very rapid social, economic, and political change in the Soviet Union.

Adelman decided to write a second book after she revisited Moscow in the summer of 1992 and spent time catching up on events in the lives of her young respondents. According to her own admission, she did not set out to write a second book but was so impressed by what had transpired in the lives of these young adults that she decided again to commit their words to paper. While this book is a follow-up study, it stands well on its own.

Russia has experienced enormous changes during the past decade, and it has been the nation's young people who have responded most energetically to these changes. The pages of Adelman's books chronicle both their enthusiasm and hope and their apprehension and disillusionment. Those negative sentiments are much more in evidence in The Children of Perestroika Come of Age than in the earlier book. On the one hand, this is a reflection of the fact that her "children" are older now and confronting the more serious obligations of adult life. It is also a testimony to the toll that the prolonged period of change and uncertainty which Russia has been experiencing has taken on her population.

The young people interviewed by Adelman represent many segments of Soviet and post-Soviet Russian society. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.