Academic journal article Attention, Perception and Psychophysics

Calculating Salience

Academic journal article Attention, Perception and Psychophysics

Calculating Salience

Article excerpt

VISUAL SALIENCE

Bruce & Tsotsos (2009). Saliency, attention, and visual search. J Vis, 9(3), Art. 5.

When looking at a scene, where should attention be directed next? This question has been the source of an ever-rising stream of empirical and theoretical work. We have an intuitive notion that our attention and eyes will be drawn to the most salient spot when faced with a new scene, and in the work of Koch, Ullman, Itti, Nothdurft, Rosenholtz, and others, this has become formalized as the idea of a salience map. Early salience models tended to direct attention to the item most different from its neighbors, on the basis of the output of some approximation of the receptive field properties in early visual areas. The last few years have seen a move to the ideas that attention and/or the eyes forage for information and that the most "salient" spot should be the one that tells you the most-for some different approaches, see the work of Najemnik and Geisler, the surprise theory of Baldi and Itti, or the work of Cottrell's group. The report highlighted here, by Bruce and Tsotsos, shows how one model that starts from this information-gathering view can create an architecture that has a physiologically plausible feel to it. …

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