Academic journal article Medium Aevum

'Metre En Romanz': Les Romans D'antiquité Du XIIe et Leur Postérité (XIIIe-XIVe Siècle)

Academic journal article Medium Aevum

'Metre En Romanz': Les Romans D'antiquité Du XIIe et Leur Postérité (XIIIe-XIVe Siècle)

Article excerpt

Francine Mora-Lebrun, 'Metre en romanz': Les romans d'antiquité du XIIe et leur postérité (XIIIe-XIVe siècle), Series Moyen Age: Outils de synthèse 3 (Paris: Honoré Champion, 2008). 608 pp. ISBN 978-2-7453-1634-9. euro,100.00.

Ostensibly a work of synthesis, this volume revisits in detail the issues and debates that have arisen during the last 1 50-odd years of scholarship on the romans d'antiquité. Francine Mora-Lebrun defines the roman d'antiquité as an adaptation or translation into French of a Latin text from classical antiquity; as a result, the corpus of study is extended to include not only the usual Roman de Troie, Roman d'Eneas, and Roman de Thèbes, but also Simund de Freine's Roman de Philosophie, Piramus et Tisbé, Athis et Prophilias, Narcissus, Philomena, and even Floire et Blancheflor. The Alexander romances, however, are excluded because of their hybrid structure, as is Gautier d'Arras 's Eracle. This extended corpus allows the author to explore in greater depth the implications of stylistic and rhetorical features present in Troie, Thebes, and Eneas. The book comprises four parts. Part I, La mise en roman: le phénomène et son milieu', presents the cultural and political context to the production of these texts, in particular the so-called 'twelfth-century renaissance' (the School of Chartres, the court of Henry II Plantagenet), extant manuscript witnesses, and issues of textual transmission. Part II explores the ideological issues concomitant with the principle of translatio underpinning the romans d'antiquité, all of which result in the conscious narrowing of the gap between knight and clerk: the adaptation techniques used; the tendency towards encyclopaedic insertions; anachronisms and historical 'fact'; political discourse and role models; feudal tensions depicted under classical garb. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.