Academic journal article Creative Nursing

Don't Leave Me This Way or, When I Get Back on My Feet You'll Be Sorry

Academic journal article Creative Nursing

Don't Leave Me This Way or, When I Get Back on My Feet You'll Be Sorry

Article excerpt

Don't Leave Me This Way or, When I Get Back on My Feet You'll Be Sorry Julia Fox Garrison. New York: Harper, 2007, 352 pages, $13.95 (soft cover)

Julia Fox Garrison was an active, presumably healthy 37-year-old working professional, wife, mother, member of a large family, and friend to many, when she had a totally unexpected and initially unexplained massive stroke. This book is the story of her continuing journey toward recovery, a journey that few expected she would live long enough to even begin. A journey taken using a map dictated by her own heart and gut, oft en against medical advice, and with several unexpected side trips along the way.

Merriam-Webster's Dictionary (1995) defines evoke as "to call forth or up" (p. 179), provoke as "to incite anger: incense, to stir up on purpose" (p. 419), and invoke as "to appeal to" (p. 277). This reviewer believes that any reader, depending on his or her background and life experiences, will identify with one or all of these three verbs while reading Julia's story. As was the case with this reader (a registered nurse), people in the healing professions may struggle with being only provoked by the depiction put forth by the author. From the beginning there may be a tendency to be sidetracked by her euphemisms and her labeling of her health care professionals. This is not a book for anyone easily offended. Aft er all, who would want to be identified as "Dr Jerk," "Nurse Doom," or "Ms In Your House OT" (Occupational Therapist). …

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