Academic journal article Canadian Social Science

The Moderating Effect of Gender Differences between Mentoring and Individuals' Career/L'EFFET MODÉRATEUR DES DIFFÉRENCES DE SEXE ENTRE LE MENTOR ET LA CARRIÈRE INDIVIDUELLE

Academic journal article Canadian Social Science

The Moderating Effect of Gender Differences between Mentoring and Individuals' Career/L'EFFET MODÉRATEUR DES DIFFÉRENCES DE SEXE ENTRE LE MENTOR ET LA CARRIÈRE INDIVIDUELLE

Article excerpt

Abstract:

This study was conducted to examine the effect of mentoring program and gender differences on individuals' career using 153 usable questionnaires gathered from employees who work in one public university in Sarawak, Malaysia. Outcomes of hierarchical regression analysis showed two important findings: firstly, interaction between formal mentoring and gender differences positively and significantly correlated with individuals' career. Secondly, interaction between informal mentoring and gender differences positively and significantly correlated with individuals' career. This result confirms that gender differences do act as a moderating variable in the mentoring model of the organizational sample. In addition, implications and discussion are elaborated.

Keywords: Formal Mentoring; Informal Mentoring; Gender Differences; Individuals' Career

Résumé: Cette étude était conduite à examiner l'effet du programme de mentor et des différences de sexe sur la carrière individuelle, en utilisant 153 questionnaires utilisables recueillis de salariés qui travaillent dans une universitaire publique à Sarawak en Malaisie. Les résultats de l'analyse de la régression hiérarchique montre deux conclusions importantes : d'bord, interaction entre le mentor officiel et les les différence de sexe mises en corrélation positive et significative avec la carrière individuelles. Deuxièmement, interaction entre le mentor familier et les différence de sexe mises en corrélation positive et significative avec la carrière individuelles. Cet résultat confirme que les différences de sexe agit certainement comme une variable modératrice dans le modèle de mentor de l'échantillon organisateur. En plus, les implications et les discussions sont élaborées.

Mots-Clés: mentor officiel; mentor familier; différences de sexe et carrière individuelle

1. INTRODUCTION

Mentoring is traditionally viewed as an important field of education (Johnson et al., 1991) and/or counseling (Gregson, 1994) whereby mentors are old man who have wisdom and can be trusted to educate young man who have little experience (Johnson et al., 1991; Kram, 1985; Russell & Adams, 1997; Wanguri, 1996). It has inspired organizational development scholars to generally interpret the concept and practice of mentoring programs inline with the development of the current organization (Dennison, 2000; Northcott, 2000; Oliver & Aggleton, 2002).

In an organizational context, mentoring is often viewed as a method of training and development program that can be used to increase group and/or individuals' potentials to carry out particular duties and responsibilities, familiarize with new techniques, and care all aspects of mentees (Hanford & Ehrich, 2006; Johnson et al., 1991; Long, 2002). Mentoring models have been designed and administered based on differences and uniqueness of an organization in terms of believes, orientations, stresses, strengths and weaknesses (Hawkey, 1997; Irving et al., 2003; Ritchie & Conolly, 1993; Ritchie & Genoni, 1999). These factors have affected the implementation of mentoring type whether formal and/or informal mentoring activities in organizations (Chao et al., 1992; Murray, 1991; Ragins & Cotton, 1993, 1999). Formal mentoring program is often viewed as the structured and coordinated relationship between mentor and mentee, using standard norms, continuously action plans, time frame, and particular objectives (Bahniuk & Hill, 1998; Hansford et al., 2003; Noe et al., 2002). Specifically, this mentoring program has salient characteristics: first, mentor is defined as a more knowledgeable and experienced person (e.g., senior staff) whereas mentee is defined as a less knowledgeable and experienced person (e.g., junior staff) (Kram, 1985; Dreher & Cox, 1996; Noe et al., 2002). Second, mentors should act as role models, teaches, sponsors, encourages, counsels, and befriends to mentees in order to increase individuals' new knowledge, up to date skills and positive attitudes (Anderson & Shannon, 1988; Kram, 1985; Levinson et al. …

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