Academic journal article Gender & Behaviour

Gender Differences in Students' Response to Corrupt Practices in Nigeria

Academic journal article Gender & Behaviour

Gender Differences in Students' Response to Corrupt Practices in Nigeria

Article excerpt

The problem of corruption has become a serious threat to the moral, religious, social, economic and political foundations of Nigeria as a nation. The problem seems to have become a national malady defiling solution in spite of efforts put in place to control it. Many scholars have attested that a large percentage of the population tend more toward corruption. The aim of this case study was to find out the view of the male and female students in the tertiary institutions in Nigeria as it relates to corrupt practices. The study was a survey which employed questionnaire as its major instrument while percentages and t- test were used to analyze the data collected. The findings show that there is no significant difference in the views of the female and male respondents towards corrupt practices. Suggestions were offered on how to solve the problem of corruption in Nigeria.

Corruption is a dynamic phenomenon that seems to be world wide. The report of Transparency International (TI) 2003 shows the prevalence of corrupt practices in varying degrees across the world and especially among the developing countries like Bangladesh, Iran, Philippines, Kenya and many others. According to TI (2003), "despite a decade of progress establishing anti- corruption laws and regulations, today's results indicate that much remains to be done before we see meaningful improvements in the lives of the world's poorest citizen." (Wikipedia Free Encyclopedia). The States who were parties to the United Nations Convention against Corruption in 2005 were convinced that corruption is no longer a local matter but a transnational phenomenon that affects all societies and economies, making international cooperation to prevent and control it essential.

Corruption is one of the major social problems that Nigeria, in particular, has been grappling with right from its inception as a nation. Historical evidence shows that the First Republic in Nigeria (1960-65) was terminated by military intervention because of the excesses of corrupt politicians. At present, the problem seems to have become a national malady defiling solution in spite of efforts put in place to control it. According to Ayoola (2008) the soaring number of corruption cases and the inability of the anti-graft agencies to cope with the avalanche pose a major problem to the Federal Government anti-graft crusade. After eight years of efforts in combating the menace, it appears the main anti-graft bodies have become overwhelmed by the worsening incidence of corruption and its rapid spread.

Many scholars have attested that a large percentage of the population tends more toward corruption. The aim of this study is to find out the view of male and female in the tertiary institutions to corrupt practices in Nigeria

LITERATURE REVIEW

The Concept of Corruption

According to Wikipedia Free Encyclopedia, corruption is a general concept describing any organized, interdependent system in which part of the system is either not performing duties it was originally intended to, or performing them in an improper way, to the detriment of the system's original purpose. It is essentially termed as an "impairment of integrity, virtue or moral principle; depravity, decay, and/ or an inducement to wrong by improper or unlawful means, a departure from the original or from what is pure or correct, and/ or an agency or influence that corrupts."

Transparency International (2003) defines corruption as the abuse of entrusted power for private gain. Peng, (2008) describes corruption as the abuse of public power for private benefits, usually in the form of bribery. Odekunle (1984) identifies five types of corruption, namely: political corruption which refers to activities connected with the election, succession and the manipulation of people and institutions to gain power and office; economic corruption whereby businessmen bid for favours to any level provided the economic cost of such favours does not exceed the returns and the value made possible by such corrupt acts; bureaucratic corruption which involves buying favours from bureaucrats who formulate and administer government economic and political policies; judicial corruption which refers to the use of wealth to secure police attention and bails, and even to pervert the administration of justice; and moral corruption involving the exploitation of man by man. …

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