Academic journal article Attention, Perception and Psychophysics

Eagle-Eyed or Beagle-Eyed?

Academic journal article Attention, Perception and Psychophysics

Eagle-Eyed or Beagle-Eyed?

Article excerpt

AUTISM

BACH & DAKIN (in press). Eagle-eyed visual acuity: An experimental investigation of enhanced perception in autism. Biol Psychiatry. doi:10.1016/j.biopsych.2009.02.035

BALDASSI ET AL. (2009). Search superiority in autism within, but not outside the crowding regime. Vis Res, 49, 2151.

CREWTHER & SUTHERLAND (in press). The more he looked inside, the more Piglet wasn't there: Is autism really blessed with visual hyperacuity? Biol Psychiatry. doi:10.1016/j.biopsych.2009.02.036

People with autism have surprisingly good vision. For one thing, they seem able to find simple geometric shapes in complicated line drawings more rapidly than do normal observers (Shah & Frith, 1983, J Child Psychol Psychiatry 24:613). They also have unusually short reaction times when visually searching for conjunctions (Plaisted et al., 1998, J Child Psychol Psychiatry 39:777) and unique features (O'Riordan, 2004, Autism 8:229). However, three new studies cast doubt on previous claims (Ashwin et al., 2009, Biol Psychiatry 65:17) of "eagle-eyed" acuity in autistic spectrum disorder. Two of them (Crewther & Sutherland, Bach & Dakin) explain how a methodological artifact must have contaminated estimates of 20:7 acuity (i. …

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