Academic journal article Competition Forum

Comparative Analysis of Academic Kakistocratic and Bureaucratic Management Systems

Academic journal article Competition Forum

Comparative Analysis of Academic Kakistocratic and Bureaucratic Management Systems

Article excerpt

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

This paper is about ideas and views of professionals in the field of academic administrative leadership. It is concerned about general philosophical positions of faculty members and administrators concerning students' general education, information, intelligence, communication, and critical thinking abilities. In addition, it analyzes the main objectives of higher educational leadership models within the boundaries of democracy and multiculturacy in relationships with the interest of stakeholders. Within this domain of thinking, this paper is fully devoted to a comparative study of two types academic leaderships: (1) kakistocracy and (2) bureaucracy. Kakistocracy means "government by the worst administrators and/or management by the least able and disqualified figureheads." Within the notion of bureaucratic educational leadership, academic administrators' basic principle is to follow the blueprint of politico-educational ideology to keep in mind when observing students in varied programs and practices for a planned labor market change. Bureaucracy is defined the ideal or pure form of a large and complex organization. It is a formal system of organization and administration designed to ensure efficiency and effectiveness. Nevertheless, meritocracy negates both types of kakistocratic and bureaucratic academic leaderships.

KEYWORDS: Kakistocratic management systems, Bureaucratic management systems, Democracy, Multiculturacy, Political reflective democracy, Political multiculturacy

INTRODUCTION

Within academic boundaries of learning enhancement, colleges and universities play the most important role in advancing socio-economic development and growth of a nation. Also, the impact of the successful universityindustry competitive relationships in a country, and the fact that the country becomes internationally well-known through both academicians and businesspeople need to establish linkages among themselves and other governmental authorities in order to improve higher educational systems. One hope for increasing academic effectiveness is through application of scientific management in the internal operation of colleges and universities. With campus-wide networking systems, possibility of utilizing financial resources, educational information systems, and databases, particularly in the teaching and research processes, are certainly one method for improving the effectiveness and efficiency of all colleges and universities. Nevertheless, appointment of capable academic leaders in the higher institutional leadership positions is crucial, because colleges and universities need to be inspired and directed by thoughtful chancellors and campus presidents. The principle tenet of the qualitative academic services is that, educational leaders may possess the most effective roles when they are personally involved in conceptualizing, communicating, formulating, implementing, and evaluating campus vision-mission aspirations, cultural values, and curriculum enrichment programs. The strategic direction must be clear, visible, and well integrated into management systems. At the same time, campus leaders should assume their roles through their active leadership in public and professional activities. Ideally, senior academic leaders' involvement should include a visible commitment to institutional constituencies' growth, curriculum development, and promote faculty participation in the institutional governance. Within the context of scientific advancement, technological breakthroughs, sociocultural enhancement, and politico-economical development and growth, there are twofold extremity of variations of academic leadership theory in terms of the authority vested in the system's chancellor and/or a campus presidency. These two types of leadership styles are: (1) kakistocracy, and (2) bureaucracy. Our objective in this paper is to compare causes, processes, and effects of application of these two types of campus leadership theories. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.