Academic journal article Research and Theory for Nursing Practice

Studies Illustrate Centrality of Family to Nursing's Perspective

Academic journal article Research and Theory for Nursing Practice

Studies Illustrate Centrality of Family to Nursing's Perspective

Article excerpt

Concepts central to nursing's metaparadigm are generally accepted as person, environment, health, and nursing. Yet, while the focus of nursing care is usually directed toward an individual, the notion of family is ever-present within a nursing perspective, perhaps as a partner in a dyad, a corecipient of care, a caregiver, or collectively as the context in which the health and welfare of an individual is realized. Several articles in this issue of Research and Theory for Nursing Practice remind us of the inextricable connection between the individual and their family and its relevance to nursing science and care.

Crist and colleagues examine the role of acculturation and familism on burden and use of home care services among caregivers of Mexican American elders. In this quantitative study, the reciprocal relationships between family members that affect their individual health are implicit and researchers go further to consider how the meaning of family to this ethnic group shapes their health, their expectations, and acceptance of nursing care.

In a theoretical article, Campbell elaborates on the role of caregiver stress in precipitating behavioral problems in individuals with dementia. They propose an expansion to the stress process model of caregiver stress that more fully recognizes the dyadic nature of the caregiver-care recipient partnership and categorize outcomes of this process in terms of the dyad as actor-partner effects, cross-partner effects, and common fate effects. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.