Academic journal article The Journal of Chickasaw History and Culture

Editor's Introduction

Academic journal article The Journal of Chickasaw History and Culture

Editor's Introduction

Article excerpt

In this issue of The Journal of Chickasaw History and Culture, readers will discover two articles of different historical perspectives, and from different times and places. Both articles, however, speak to the breadth and distance in time of Chickasaw history. One article is written at the individual level - biographical in approach, and deals with the twentieth century. The other article is a history at the tribal level. It deals with inter-tribal diplomacy in a far more distant time for the tribe. Though the two articles seem worlds apart in subject, time, and place, they are part of the grander Chickasaw experience - a legacy that influences such important matters as individual and communal identity and the way the world is seen through Chickasaw eyes. I hope this Journal issue will help develop further pride in the tribe's past and present, and lead us all to ponder more intently what makes us individually and collectively Chickasaw.

The first article is a familiar theme for The Journal lately; that of a WW II Chickasaw veterans' story. Patrick Kennedy, a prior contributor to The Journal, offers a biographical article about his uncle, William Kennedy, who served in the Pacific Theater of action during WW II. Most of his time in the Navy was spent aboard a destroyer. Once again, we find the great involvement of Chickasaws in that great conflict, how the war affected their lives, and in turn, how that has affected our understanding of twentieth-century Chickasaw history and identity. …

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