Academic journal article Journal of Allied Health

Attitudes of Students in Medicine, Nursing, Occupational Therapy, and Physical Therapy toward Interprofessional Education

Academic journal article Journal of Allied Health

Attitudes of Students in Medicine, Nursing, Occupational Therapy, and Physical Therapy toward Interprofessional Education

Article excerpt

With the growing interest in interprofessional education and practice, methods to evaluate the effectiveness of related curricular activities are essential. The purpose of this study was twofold: ( 1 ) to assess the attitudes of students in medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, and physical therapy toward interprofessional education using the Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale and Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale and (2) to compare data with normative data previously reported. The two instruments were administered to 474 first-year students in medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, and physical therapy who completed the forms in the context of a workshop at the conclusion of the first year of an interprofessional health mentor program. Differences among professions were reported. Students in medicine and physical therapy rated members of their own professions significantly higher in the areas of competence/autonomy and need for cooperation as compared with those in nursing and occupational therapy. Along with reporting similarities and differences, the results provide additional normative data on these tools that can be used when choosing tools to evaluate interprofessional education attitudes. J Allied Health 2009; 38:196-200.

INTERPROFESSIONAL EDUCATION "occurs when two or more professions learn with, from and about each other to improve collaboration and the quality of care."1 The National Health Service workforce plan in the United Kingdom in 2000 highlighted the need to prepare students for interprofessional practice and recommended the development of prelicensure common learning curricula.2 Interprofessional education has the potential to improve understanding among members of the health care team with the goal of enhancing patient and health outcomes.3 The Institute of Medicine, which provides advice on national health issues in the United States, has also emphasized the need for all health professionals to be educated to provide patient-centered care as members of interdisciplinary teams.4 The president of the Association of American Medical Colleges, representing allopathic medical schools in North America, designated interprofessional education and practice as key areas of its strategic plan in 2008. 5

The most recent Cochrane Review6 (an international organization that systematically reviews the effects of health care interventions) summarized the empirical research evidence on both prelicensure and postlicensure interprofessional collaborative interventions. They found that only six studies met the randomization design and instrument validity criteria, four of which showed positive improvement in outcomes. These four studies included methods to improve collaboration and patient care, including changes in the culture of an emergency department with associated patient satisfaction, collaborative team behavior and reduction in clinical error rates for emergency department teams, enhanced management of care delivered to domestic violence victims, and improvements in the competence of mental health practitioners related to the delivery of patient care. Additionally, in July 2008, a Canadian Interprofessional Health Collaborative report provided a synthesis and critical appraisal of the evidence for interprofessional education in the systematic review literature.7 Varying strategies to promote interprofessional education have been reported in the literature,8-14 along with reports on evaluation of interprofessional education interventions.15-17 With the growing importance of interprofessional education and practice, methods to evaluate the effectiveness of interprofessional curricular activities are essential. The purpose of this study was twofold: (1) to assess the attitudes of students in medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, and physical therapy toward interprofessional education using the Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale (IEPS) and Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS) and (2) to compare data with normative data previously reported by Hawk et al. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.