Academic journal article Electronic Green Journal

Review: Marine Reserves: A Guide to Science, Design and Use

Academic journal article Electronic Green Journal

Review: Marine Reserves: A Guide to Science, Design and Use

Article excerpt

Review: Marine Reserves: A Guide to Science, Design and Use By Jack Sobel and Craig Dahlgren Reviewed by Ryder W. Miller San Francisco, USA Jack Sobel and Craig Dahlgren. Marine Reserves: A Guide to Science, Design and Use. Island Press (2004). 383 pages. Trade Paper ISBN: 1-55963-841-9 US $35.00 Trade Cloth ISBN: 1-55963-840-0 US $70.00 Printed on recycled, acid-free paper.

This thorough explanation of and rationale for marine protected areas details in common sense terms why they are necessary. Marine reserves can protect the seeding grounds for fish and therefore also the fishery stocks that fishing communities have depended upon. They can also protect the denizens of marine ecosystems that have been adversely affected by fishing. As the authors note:

"Considerable evidence that marine reserves are capable of increasing the abundance or density of exploited species is...provided by studies that have examined the change in the abundance or density of exploited species in an area over time before and after a reserve has been created. These studies typically show an increase in the abundance of exploited species within the reserve area for several years following its designation" (p. 97).

The political and legal history of marine protection is somewhat complicated due to numerous marine protection area designations and laws, but it is presented clearly and in a concerned way by the authors. Jack Sobel is a director at the Ocean Conservancy, and Craig Dahlgren is a science director at the Caribbean Research Center at the Perry Institute for Marine Science. …

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