Academic journal article Electronic Green Journal

Review: Fatal Harvest: The Tragedy of Industrial Agriculture

Academic journal article Electronic Green Journal

Review: Fatal Harvest: The Tragedy of Industrial Agriculture

Article excerpt

Review: Fatal Harvest: The Tragedy of Industrial Agriculture By Andrew Kimbrell (Ed.) Reviewed by Kim Marie Pezza Marion, NY, USA Andrew Kimbrell (Ed.). Fatal Harvest: The Tragedy of Industrial Agriculture. Washington DC: Island Press, 2002. 384 pp. ISBN 1-55963-941-5. Recycled, chlorine-free paper.

There are times when modernization does much more harm than good. What has happened in the "progression" of agriculture can be described as controversial at best, and, as the title states, fatal at its worst. The search for bigger, better, and perfection in our agricultural products has resulted in the weakening of genetic pools, extinction of a number of varieties of fruits, vegetables, and livestock that were available to us in the early 20th century, a massive use of chemicals, pesticides and hormones as well as "warehoused" livestock. This, along with the takeover of factory farming, has brought agriculture, our food supply, into a tragic situation that those before us could never have imagined.

Fatal Harvest discusses all of this along with the grassroots movement that has started to try to correct or reverse this situation as much as possible. Examples include the surge of the organics market and the steps some small farmers are taking to meet the new consumer demands of safe, chemical free, and humanly raised foods, along with the daily struggles between those who want healthier foods and farms and those whose bottom line is production, no matter what the cost, be it to the animals, humans, or environment. …

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