Academic journal article Nursing Education Perspectives

An Academic-Business Partnership for Advancing Clinical Informatics

Academic journal article Nursing Education Perspectives

An Academic-Business Partnership for Advancing Clinical Informatics

Article excerpt

IN 1999, TWO VISIONARY LEADERS, the dean of the University of

Kansas School of Nursing and the chairman/founder of the Cerner

Corporation, made a pact to imbed a clinical information system (CIS)

in the basic cirriculum for the preparation of future nurses. The new

cirriculum represents a change in teaching approach rather than content, with

information technology replacing penand paper for a variety of teaching and

learning activities. > The short-term goal of this endeavor was to make the

new technology tools that are available in the marketplace the medium

through which future nurses would learn to work. The long-term goal was to

expand the new learning environment to the other health professional schools

(Allies Health and Medicine) on campus. > THE SECONF LEVEL of a pilot

project with a small cohort of basic baccalaureate nursing students is now com

plete. This group started using the technology-based teaching approach during

the first semester of nursing courses and will continue to use it throughout

the entire program. Now that the initial period has been accomplished, the

curriculum s being extended to the full nursing student body. Implementation

with the other hea;th professional disciplines as well as graduate nursing students

is in the beginning stage. > THE IMPETUS for this radical educational

change is the reality that the health care industry is rapidly moving to a

electronic-mediated work environment. The swift action to fully integrate

information technology (IT) in health care resulted fron the publication of

two Institute of Medicine (IOM) studies in late 1999 and early 2001 (1,2).

These reports on quality, errors, and waste in the United States health care

system twice stunned the nation. At the heart of the IOM committee's recom

mendations is the assertion that IT must play a central role in the redesign of

the health care system if substantial improvement in health care quality is to

be achieved (2). > ACADEMIC INSTITUTIONS THAT EDUCATE HEALTH PROFESSIONALS

DO NOT HAVE THE TOOLS REQUIRED TO TEACH STUDENTS HOW TO WORK THROUGH

ELECTRONIC PATIENT RECORD SYSTEMS WITH CLINICAL DECISION SUPPORTS. Indeed, the

halth care industry is faced with the prospect of practice outpacing academia as

information technology becomes commonplace in health care delivery organiza

tions. This article describes the development, implementation, and initial outcomes

of an innovative academic-business venture that aims to provide future nurses with

the unique skill set required to function in a fully automated health care system.

ABSTRACT A jointly funded partnership between the school of nursing at a large midwestern university and a premier health care information technology supplier represents a pioneering event for education and for the health care information technology industry. The impetus for this partnership arose from Institute of Medicine reports published in late 1999 and early 2001 addressing the quality, error, and waste in the health care system in the United States. The Simulated E-hEalth Delivery System (SEEDS) provides opportunities based on best practices in education to learn and practice clinical skills in a state-of-the-art environment using a live-production, clinical information system designed for care delivery. A pilot project that began with a small cohort of baccalaureate nursing students has been implemented and extended. SEEDS will also be extended to other health professional programs.

Project Overview The partnership between the University of Kansas School of Nursing and the Cerner Corporation represents a pioneering first for nursing education and for the health care information technology industry. …

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