Academic journal article Electronic Green Journal

Review: Adaptive Governance: The Dynamics of Atlantic Fisheries Management

Academic journal article Electronic Green Journal

Review: Adaptive Governance: The Dynamics of Atlantic Fisheries Management

Article excerpt

Review: Adaptive Governance: The Dynamics of Atlantic Fisheries Management By D.G. Webster Reviewed by Ryder W. Miller Webster, D.G. Adaptive Governance: The Dynamics of Atlantic Fisheries Management. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2009. 376pp. ISBN 9780262731928. US$67.00, cloth. Recycled paper.

To study international fisheries management, D.G. Webster, a researcher at the Wrigley Institute for Environmental Studies at the University of Southern California, documents in case studies the fisheries management history of some of the highly migratory fisheries populations to be found in the Atlantic Ocean. There are eight case studies of Atlantic fisheries stock presented covering the tropical tunas (bigeye, yellow, skipjack), billifishes (swordfish (northern, southern) and marlin (blue, white)), and bluefin tuna (western, eastern). The marine management stories presented focus on the management decisions of the ICCAT, the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas, and their SCRC, Standing Committee on Research and Statistics.

To explain variance in management measures, Webster develops and studies what she calls a "vulnerability response framework" which in this book is a response of marine management organizational economic flexibility and competitiveness. In the publisher's words "Vulnerability, mainly economic in this context, acts as an indicator for domestic susceptibility to the increasing competition associated with open access and related stock declines" (back cover).

Oran R. Young, Professor of Institutional and International Governance, Environmental Institutions at University of California, Santa Barbara, writes in the foreword that "[Webster's] work will have played a significant role in the ongoing effort to improve our understanding of environmental governance" (p.xiv).

Webster hopes "that the ideas presented here will lead to much more expansive research into other forms of human response to environmental change and resultant patterns of adaptive governance" (p.xv). As presented in her model, ineffective international management can lead to resource depletion, economic recession, growing concern and the need for more management. …

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