Academic journal article British Journal of Canadian Studies

Engaging the Enemy: Canada in the 1940s

Academic journal article British Journal of Canadian Studies

Engaging the Enemy: Canada in the 1940s

Article excerpt

A. Hiscock and M. Chamberlain (eds), Engaging the Enemy: Canada in the 1940s (Llandydie, Carmarthenshire: Canadian Studies in Wales Group, 2006), x + 250pp. Cloth. ISBN 0-9052-8581-6.

This collection comprises fifteen papers (plus a useful introduction) given at the University of Wales Conference Centre at Gregynog in 2003. Only one contribution, by Michael Simpson on the Royal Canadian Navy, deals directly with combat. Papers by Martin Thornton and Steve Hewitt consider civil rights issues relating to First Nations and the origin of the Cold War, while James Overton writes about Jehovah's Witnesses in wartime Newfoundland. Robert Wardhaugh rescues bureaucrat Clifford Clark from oblivion (was he really so forgotten?), while Robin S. Gendron looks at Canadian views of decolonisation in Asia. Geraint B. Osborne examines the war work of women in Kingston, while Muriel E. Chamberlain sees Canada through the eyes of one well-placed female observer, Sheila Ramsay MacDonald, sister and official hostess of the British High Commissioner. Raymond B. Blake takes another look at the politics of family allowances. Six contributions are cultural in nature. Len Kuffert links cultural activity to the idea of democracy, and Brian S. Osborne places art in the context of a national watershed. Andrew Hiscock writes about the poetry of Dorothy Livesay, while Nanette Norris shows how A.M. Klein challenged anti-semitism on the home front. …

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