Academic journal article British Journal of Canadian Studies

Knowledge, Clusters and Regional Innovation : Economic Development in Canada

Academic journal article British Journal of Canadian Studies

Knowledge, Clusters and Regional Innovation : Economic Development in Canada

Article excerpt

A. J. Holbrook and D. A. Wolfe (eds), Knowledge, Clusters and Regional Innovation : Economic Development in Canada (Montreal & Kingston: McGill-Queen's University Press, 2002), xiii + 284pp. Paper. £18-95. ISBN 0-8891-1919-8.

This publication is based on a number of papers which were presented to the second annual conference of the Innovation Systems Research Network (ISRN) in May 2000. The ISRN had its origin in 1998 as a three-year experiment jointly funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Council, and the National Research Council. The book draws together the work of network members to present a detailed picture of the complex web of regional and local innovation systems found across Canada. Widespread recognition that innovation is a major key to competitive advantage in modern economies has encouraged Canadians to engage fully in research and debates on such systems with emphasis on knowledge-based activities and technology-based clusters. In early 2001, Paul Martin, then minister of finance, stressed the significance of such clusters as a highly significant factor for Canada's economic prosperity.

The editors of this book claim a special place for Canada in this context, with different features in its system of innovation compared to most other industrialised nations. It is thus claimed that Canada provides a unique laboratory for interdisciplinary studies on innovation. The starting point for the collection is founded on the growing awareness of the dynamics in clusters, and an 'acceptance that geography is important and an institutional infrastructure is essential for creating the 'untraded interdependencies' that shape and constrain the innovative capabilities and competitive dynamics of firms located in that region' (p. 4). In particular, the editors point out that for Canada, in addition to significance for its major industrial regions, innovation processes are seen as key to rejuventation and growth of traditional economic activities in sectors such as resource-based products ('staples') and cultural industries.

The book is organised in a logical four-part structure: Part 1: General and Theoretical; Part 2: Empirical Investigations; Part 3: Clusters; Part 4: Local Economic Development. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.