Academic journal article British Journal of Canadian Studies

Pink Snow: Homotextual Possibilities in Canadian Fiction

Academic journal article British Journal of Canadian Studies

Pink Snow: Homotextual Possibilities in Canadian Fiction

Article excerpt

Terry Goldie, Pink Snow: Homotextual Possibilities in Canadian Fiction (Peterborough, Ontario: Broadview Press, 2003), viii + 264pp. Paper. $29.95/ £14.99. ISBN 1-55111-373-2.

This study is rooted in a queer approach to a wide selection of Canadian texts spanning from Richardson's Wacousta (1832) to Highway's Kiss of the Fur Queen (1998). Goldie states his original intention of producing a Canadian version of Robert K. Martin's The Homosexual Tradition in American Poetry, yet recognises the construction of the Canadian homosexual as problematic (p. 1). Instead, Goldie moves away from the constraints of a homogenous and monolithic homosexual identity towards what he terms the '[h]omotextual [p]ossibilities' of Canadian fiction - that is, the location of the homoerotic and the homosocial, as well as the homosexual, within textual currents.

Goldie is adept at concisely contextualising texts at the beginning of each chapter, both within Canadian fiction and within his own theoretical approach. The study makes admirable efforts to engage with theories of colonialism, post-colonialism, nation and ethnicity in order to provide a diverse and nuanced analysis. In his chapter on Ross's As for Me and My House (1941), Goldie confidently traces the interplay of gender representations using Wilde as a point of analogy. …

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