Academic journal article British Journal of Canadian Studies

With Axe and Bible: The Scottish Pioneers of New Brunswick, 1784-1874

Academic journal article British Journal of Canadian Studies

With Axe and Bible: The Scottish Pioneers of New Brunswick, 1784-1874

Article excerpt

Lucille H. Campey, With Axe and Bible: The Scottish Pioneers of New Brunswick, 1784- 1874 (Toronto: Dundurn Press, 2007), 206pp. Paper. £13.99. ISBN 978-1-897045-22-0.

With Axe and Bible is the seventh book in an accessible series of studies of Scottish emigration to Canada, c.1770-1870. Following on from work on Nova Scotia and Cape Breton, Prince Edward Island and Upper and Lower Canada, Campey analyses the not insignificant number of Scots who emigrated to New Brunswick in the same period.

The book does not follow the same format as earlier books. While, as in previous titles, a general chronological narrative is retained throughout, in With Axe and Bible many chapters deal with settlement in a particular region of New Brunswick. Among the nine chapters, we read of the Scots of Charlotte County, Northumberland County, Restigouche County and New Kincardineshire, Victoria County. The approach makes the account readable, and particularly helpful for genealogists. In common with her previous books, it features extensive tables and appendices of passenger lists and ship crossings drawn from contemporary newspapers and manuscript materials in Scotland and New Brunswick.

For readers with a specific interest in New Brunswick, this is a fascinating book, strong on primary research and exact on detail. For those with a more general interest in Scottish emigration to Canada, it may disappoint. With six previous books on the subject, there is inevitably some repetition. More obvious than the occasional repetition of material or images is the repetition of themes. Given Campey's extensive work on Scottish emigration to various Canadian regions, little is made of the regional differences of the settlers or the areas they settled. Furthermore, the work finds it difficult to entirely escape the confines of what Edward Cowen has called the 'myth of Scotch Canada'. …

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