Academic journal article Antipodes

Expanding Our Scope

Academic journal article Antipodes

Expanding Our Scope

Article excerpt

Yes, we have finally done it! After many years of answering questions about why we do not include New Zealand, both the organization, now the American Association for Australasian Literary Studies, and this journal, with its new subtitle, has embraced Aotearoa. And we welcome submissions of expository material and reviews on New Zealand writers and from New Zealand critics. The creative material (fiction and poetry) will continue to be exclusively Australian.

This is not a huge shift in practice, as we have, de facto, been publishing pieces, such as Helen Gildfind's essay on Janet Frame, Norman Oder's piece on Alan Duff, and Stephen Oliver's periodic Trans-Tasman meditations, pertaining to New Zealand, and New Zealand books by Mark Pirie, Jenny Robin Jones, and Norman Simms have long been treated in our reviews sections. But this formal avowal of New Zealand will help reconfigure the journal into a more cosmopolitan and transnational forum and hopefully enable us to draw more on the surprisingly large contingent of scholars in the US and Europe interested in New Zealand.

The change of the subtitle is, to my mind, at least as important. As I indicated in an essay published in the April 2010 issue of Australian Book Review, Antipodes has never been exclusively American in its perspective on Australian literature but has published many essays by Australian critics, as well as, from early on, Continental European scholars of the Antipodes, supplemented more recently by voices from India and China. Our contributors have always been "international" (to use the modernist term) or "global" to use the postmodern one. Although "international" is perhaps more elegant as a term than "global," by a similar logic - as implied by Jahan Ramazani in his influential 2006 essay on Modernism/Modernity that modern "bricolage" is more nuanced than postmodern "hybridity" - we have decided to "bear us like the time" (the closing line of Shakespeare-and-collaborator's The Two Noble Kinsmen) and use "global. …

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