Academic journal article Journal of Theoretical and Applied Electronic Commerce Research

Determinants of Consumers' Perceived Trust in IT-Ecosystems

Academic journal article Journal of Theoretical and Applied Electronic Commerce Research

Determinants of Consumers' Perceived Trust in IT-Ecosystems

Article excerpt

Abstract

Digital ecosystems, or IT-ecosystems (ITEs), are composed of multiple and independent entities such as individuals, organizations, services, software, and applications. Together, these elements create a number of new independent systems that operate and communicate with their own infrastructure (man to machine; machine to machine; person to person), sharing one or several missions. A better understanding of how ITEs and their interconnected components create benefits and added value for different types of consumers is of particular importance to the establishment of digital environments and to managing their resources. Considering different components of perceived trust in ITEs, we rely in this paper on a multi-dimensional framework of trust effects that includes system-centric as well as user-centric determinants of trust. Based on our conceptual model, we develop two sets of propositions. The first ones address technological drivers of trust in ITEs, whereas the second set of propositions considers individual as well as social drivers of trust. The model and propositions are discussed with reference to preliminary empirical results as well as to future research steps and business implications.

Keywords: Trust, Trustworthiness, IT-ecosystems, Digital environment, Man-machine-interaction

Introduction

In recent years, the topic of perceived trust has gained growing interest in the context of research dedicated to examining consumers' acceptance and adoption of innovative technologies in our rapidly changing digital environment. Existing studies [22], [64] indicate that perceived trust in the reliability of technical elements and structures, as well as the fairness of other internet user, is one major determinant of sustainable internet usage among individuals.

With the emergence and increasing use-density of new technologies like the mobile internet, for example, different areas of the human living environment grow digitally together. This implies novel challenges for trust-related research. Furthermore, up-and-coming technologies like RFID and future trends like ubiquitous computing, ambient intelligence, and the connected (smart) home scenario have gained special attention in both research and business practice. Consequently, a need has developed to create a multi-disciplinary framework for better understanding and managing mechanisms associated with consumer-centered trust-building, expansion, and savings.

Against this backdrop, in our study, we will focus on examining users' trust in the digital components of an ITecosystem (ITE). Because we live in a continuously virtualized environment composed of individuals, organizations, services, and software applications, it is important to rely on theoretically and empirically verified models focusing on the interactions and inter-relationships among entities embedded within an ITE. Like biological ecosystems understood as a community of independent, partly cooperating, partly competitive components that is changing steadily, an ITE lies between the conflicting priorities of autonomy versus controllability. A perfectly operating ecosystem requires controlled management and must balance its strengths, several missions, and the interactions of the entities within the ITE.

Our paper includes three main sections. First, considering different components of perceived trust in ITEs, this paper aims to develop a multi-dimensional conceptualization of trust effects, including both system-centric and user-centric determinants of trust. Second, based on our conceptual model, two sets of propositions are developed and explored. The first one is dedicated to technological drivers of trust in ITEs, whereas the second set of propositions refers to users' individual and social drivers of trust. Third, the model and propositions are discussed with reference to preliminary empirical results, future research steps and business implications. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.