Academic journal article Contributions to Music Education

Music Education Faculty Research Publication Productivity Covering the Years 1989-2003

Academic journal article Contributions to Music Education

Music Education Faculty Research Publication Productivity Covering the Years 1989-2003

Article excerpt

The purpose of this study was to determine author productivity by faculty rank (e.g., assistant, associate, full professor) and assess author output in terms of single or coauthorship. We examined author productivity from three prominent national journals within the field of music education across a 15-year period, 1989 through 2003, and determined faculty rank at the time of publication. A total of 725 articles were identified over this period. Data analysis revealed that of the total (N= 1007) single and coauthors identified, 513 (71%) were single authored and 212 (29%) were coauthored publications. Assistant Professors were proportionally the most productive faculty members and produced more single authored articles than any other group. Associate Professor authors were more active in writing single authored articles than Full Professor authors.

Emphasis on publication productivity has been a part of higher education for several decades. Generally speaking, the term productivity carries a subjective meaning whether the discussion relates to institutions belonging to the corporate world, higher education institutions, faculty, or staff. Heydiner and Simsek (1992, p. 11) write that "faculty productivity is influenced by four separate forces (a) historical; (b) societal; (c) the industry of higher education; and (d) the specific institution under discussion? Heydiner and Simsek describe the first influencing factor, historical, as the beliefs faculty hold about the professional role they perform. Societal forces, the second influence listed, relates to those broad shifts and trends continually at work within the larger society. Third, the industry of higher education., includes models of institutional success that stand at the apex of the higher education pecking order. The fourth force is institution-specific, and includes the "local" conditions or the specific socio-political-economic environment of a particular institution.

Several variables have been identified that are associated with publication productivity among the broader population. These variables include sex (Corley, 2005; Suitor, Mecom, & Feld, 2001), academic rank (Meho & Spurgin, 2005), tenure and degree level (Fairweather, 2002), career age (Lawrence & Blackburn, 1988), primary interest (Lange, Mathis, & Smith, 2002), editorial board membership (Gibbons & Fish, 1991), faculty size (Blackburn, Behymer, & Hall, 1978), presence of a doctoral program (Kleck, Wang, & Tark, 2007; Oliver, Blair, Gorman, & Woehr, 2005), presence of a graduate program (Schiele, 1991), institutional organization of the academy (Fogarty, 2004), and the nature of the work environment (Blackburn, Behysner, & Hall, 1978). In this study, the variables of academic rank and tenure were examined, and this literature review will focus on those factors. A common method of measuring scholarly productivity is to count journal articles and identify the academic affiliations of authors, for example the Council on Social Work Education (1992). The process of counting recent journal article authorship involves selecting a subset of the many journals targeting the given faculty's field to which that individual might publish (Johnson and Hull, 1995).

Most professional organizations have a way of recognizing outstanding members within their field; music education is no exception. The Music Educators National Conference: The National Association for Music Educations Senior Researcher Award is awarded to the profession's distinguished researchers. Several of the recipients of this award have addressed the topic of faculty research productivity over the years. Madsen (1988), in his Senior Researcher Award acceptance address, listed three areas of need, one of which was the development of competent researchers. Madsen encouraged prospective researchers to write and publish early in their careers and to coauthor with more experienced scholars. In his Senior Researcher Award acceptance, LeBlanc (1992, p. …

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