Academic journal article Military Review

Hitler's Traitor: Martin Bormann and the Defeat of the Reich

Academic journal article Military Review

Hitler's Traitor: Martin Bormann and the Defeat of the Reich

Article excerpt

HITLER'S TRAITOR: Martin Bormann and the Defeat of the Reich, Louis Kilzer, Presidio Press, Novato, CA, 2000, 290 pages, $29.95.

Writing about war is a continuation of politics by another means (with apologies to Clausewitz). U.S. history books and most books written by U.S. authors go to great lengths to dissect facts, explain actions, and enlighten readers about U.S. war activities. With a few notable exceptions, works about the European Theater are confined to U.S. and British actions to defeat Nazi Germany. Consequently, most Americans are woefully uninformed about the tremendous contributions and unbelievable sacrifices the Soviet Union made toward that same goal.

In Hitler's Traitor: Martin Bormann and the Defeat of the Reich, Louis Kilter examines the war from the Soviet viewpoint. In particular, he writes about a German informant named Werther, who fed information to the Soviets. Kilter contends that six to eight people involved in a Soviet spy ring were directly responsible for the Soviet Union's ability to defeat German dictator Adolf Hitler's forces. Hitler had better equipment, generals, and troops, yet Stalin and his generals were able to thwart all of Hitler's plans. …

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