Academic journal article Journal of Band Research

An Analysis of Relationships between Lesson Planning Training and Rehearsal Pacing of Undergraduate Instrumental Music Education Majors in Practice Teaching Settings

Academic journal article Journal of Band Research

An Analysis of Relationships between Lesson Planning Training and Rehearsal Pacing of Undergraduate Instrumental Music Education Majors in Practice Teaching Settings

Article excerpt

Abstract

Two groups of undergraduate instrumental music education majors taught three fiveminute lessons to an ensemble of their peers. One group (n = 11) received lesson planning training between Lesson 1 and Lesson 2; the other group (n = 1 1) received lesson planning training between Lessons 2 and 3. Video tapes of all lessons were analyzed, and means calculated for rehearsal pace (defined as the rate of alternation of activity episodes) and durations of rehearsal episodes.

Results indicated that both groups demonstrated brisker pace and provided more opportunities for student performance during lessons as the sequence progressed. Lesson planning training seemed to function as a means of accelerating me development of time use skills; more noticeable differences were observed within the group who received training later in the process. Findings suggest a possible relationship between lesson planning and rehearsal behaviors, and provide behavioral terms for identifying and describing effective teaching.

An Analysis of Relationships Between Lesson Planning Training and Rehearsal Pacing of Undergraduate Instrumental Music Education Majors in Practice Teaching Settings

Introduction and Review of Literature

In the extant research literature, the study of effective teaching in the music rehearsal setting has received considerable attention. Findings of these studies have shown that numerous behavioral variables can contribute to overall teacher effectiveness, including eye contact, teacher proximity, verbal feedback, and time use during rehearsal (Duke, 1999; Price & Byo, 2002). This body of work has provided significant insight into the development of these attributes in novices, and has helped shaped curriculum and assessment methods used for training preservice teachers.

Apart from behaviors mat can be observed during teaching, out of rehearsal behaviors such as score study and planning can also contribute to overall teacher effectiveness. Grant & Drafall (1991) describe effective teachers as those who plan a 'variety of activities within the class period' (p. 38), and who are 'thoroughly prepared for class' (p. 39). A growing body of research has examined planning procedures in a variety of contexts and among teachers of varying experience levels.

Schieuter (1991) conducted three case studies of the planning procedures of three novice elementary music student teachers. Results revealed random patterns of lesson planning, a lack of substantial repertoire of conceptual teaching methods, little consideration of individual students when planning lessons, and problems in the sequencing of lesson activities and establishment of educational goals. These issues were also addressed in a qualitative study of elementary music student teachers by Snow (1998), who found that group brainstorming activities resulted in creative and unique lesson activities, which helped novice teachers plan more effective lessons.

Britten (2005) compared planning procedures of preservice and experienced instrumental music teachers. Preservice participants included undergraduate and graduate music education students; teachers had prior experience ranging from one to fourteen years. Participants studied a given page of a standard beginning band method book and developed a lesson plan they might use to teach the content on the page to a group of beginning instrumentalists. Then, participants were given a similar lesson plan developed by the investigator for comparison. Results indicated that preservice teachers used more words and narratives to describe lesson activities. Warm-up activities were the most common types of activities used by participants in all groups, and 95% of all participants used a teaching strategy involving the breakdown of content into its smaller component parts and isolation of specific elements out of context.

In a qualitative analysis of planning skills, Schmidt (2005) tracked the lesson plans of 10 preservice string teachers during a semester-long practicum. …

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