Academic journal article Southern Quarterly

Editor's Introduction

Academic journal article Southern Quarterly

Editor's Introduction

Article excerpt

Fall comes late to the Deep South. Eventually, however, we too approach winter. We may bundle up against occasional bursts of freezing weather, the last tail end of an arctic blast, and wake to a hard frost that fixes leaves in their color and which spells the end of sugarcane and cotton and, often, the start of hunting season. Winter will be just around the corner and, one may hope, so will sorghum syrup and deer sausage and the smell of wood-smoke, even still. But then we are just as likely to get clear blue skies and 80-degree weather for Thanksgiving, and bright red camellias for Christmas, both punctuated by torrential downpours and a good long season of local oysters for the rest of the "R" months (when oysters should be eaten), through Mardi Gras.

In this Fall issue, essays range widely, from senior scholars on the rigors of travel in antebellum Mississippi (the Natchez Trace) and on what recently was termed "The Best Work of Southern Nonfiction of All Time" (Let Us Now Praise Famous Men), respectively; to work by promising graduate students - one a study of the contested meanings in the autobiography of a Cuban woman who had fought in the Civil War as a man - the other of black resistance to the restoration of white supremacy in a Reconstruction-era county in Virginia's Shenandoah Valley. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.