Academic journal article Transactions of the American Philosophical Society

Appendix 1: Printed Text for Student of Greek, 1471-1529

Academic journal article Transactions of the American Philosophical Society

Appendix 1: Printed Text for Student of Greek, 1471-1529

Article excerpt

(ProQuest: ... denotes non-USASCII text omitted.)

This appendix contains every student manual known to me. It includes works that have only a page or two of grammatical material, such as the brief introduction in the NewTestament volume of the Complutensian Polyglot or the few leaves bound with the Psalter of 1518. It does not include works on the pronunciation of Greek, such as Jacobus Ceratinus's De sono litterarum. It is unlikely that the list presented here is complete. Because catalog entries are sometimes misleading or ambiguous, I have attempted to look at as many of these works as possible. Editions that I have not seen are marked with an asterisk. All editions in the Bayerische Staatsbibliothek in Munich recorded here have been consulted in digital facsimiles. One of die purposes of this list is to banish a number of bibliographical ghosts from the record. Consequcntiy, while I have made use of standard bibliographies, I have been reluctant to acknowledge the existence of any edition that does not have a verifiable library shelfmark attached to it. Where I do not give a shelfmark among the references, I have been unable to locate a copy.

A second purpose of this appendix is to define the uncertainties surrounding the dating of many of these editions. In describing the contents, I do not remark on final colophons, but I do notice all colophons that interrupt the sequence of texts in the edition. I have recorded dates attached to prefatory material. Where the dating of an edition is controversial or uncertain, I have attempted to indicate some of the boundaries within which speculation must move. A further problem with dating these books arises from the use by some printers of Greek dates in their colophons. I have dealt more fully with this problem in another place.1 Here it is sufficient to note that these have usually been dated according to the interpretation of the calendar expounded by Theodore Gaza in his treatise De mensibus, published in Rome around 1470.2 The translations of the Athenian months printed in all early Greek léxica supply a rather different calendar, one that was certainly used on some occasions by Aldus Manutius and John Frohen in Venice and Basle, and very probably used by Gilles de Gourmont in Paris.

I have provided details of editions of prefatory or other material, but I cannot have located all the available reprints of these texts. For this reason, I have provided incipits for these works so diat these references may be expanded. All information supplied in square brackets is inferred. In the transcription of titles I have preserved capitalization and punctuation while silently expanding abbreviations. I have not supplied or corrected the accentuation of Greek titles.

INCUNABLES

1. SUPER, .... [Venice: A. von Ambergau, e. 1471.1 Content: Preface, inc. Cum nos !ibellum ... (no date, Pertusi " ???t?µata,"'' 324); Latin explanation of Chrysoloras, not by Guarino Veronese. Reference: ISTC ic00492000; Manchester, John Rylands Library, 19651.

2. [Chrysoloras, Erotemata.] !Vicenza: printer of Chrysoioras's Erotemata, c. 1475-76.1 Content: Chrysoloras, abbreviated by Guarino, in Greek and Latin; Ave Maria; Pater noster, alphabet. Reference: ISTC ic00493000; BL, IA.31762.

3. .... Milan: D. Paravisinus, January 30, 1476. Content: D. Damilas to young students, inc. ... . . . (Botfield, Prefaces, 163-64; Legrand, Bibliographie hellénique, 1:4-5); Latin version, inc. Cum vos rerum . . . (Botfield, Prefaces, 164-65); Lascaris, Compendium, in Greek; pseudo-Tryphon; De anemalis verbis; De spiritibus. Reference: Leg/and, Bibliojjraphie hellénique, item no. 1; Fraenkel, "Introduction"; ISTC U00065000; Cambridge, University Library, Inc.4.B.7.6 [1894].

4. Saxoli Pratensis viri dottissimi de accentibus ac dìpbtbonjjis et formation e praeteritor um jjraecorum. [Milan: Bonaccorso, e. 1480.) Content: Alphabet and its divisions. Seven printed (eaves. …

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