Academic journal article The Middle East Journal

Editor's Note

Academic journal article The Middle East Journal

Editor's Note

Article excerpt

This issue marks the first issue of our 65th year, and I hope continues our long tradition of providing varied and informative research and analysis of the modern Middle East.

Our first article, by Katherine Blue Carroll of Vanderbilt University, is based on field research conducted in Iraq under the US Army's Human Terrain program, and looks at the role of traditional tribal law in dispute resolution since the invasion.

Most Middle East specialists, like most governments, have long felt that a twostate solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is inevitable, although it has proved difficult to achieve. There have always been dissenting voices, however, and as the peace process has stagnated, both some Palestinians and increasingly some Israelis have suggested that a one-state solution might become inevitable, given demographic (and democratic) realities. Two of our articles explore the possible alternatives to a twostate solution. Leila Farsakh of the University of Massachusetts in Boston examines the challenges and options of a one-state solution for Palestinians. Attorney Nathan Witkin offers a different approach: an "interspersed nation-state system" in which the two states would share the same land.

We publish these two rather different approaches without intending to endorse either, but rather to raise the question of what the implications are if a two-state solution remains out of reach. …

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