Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

Angelo Clareno Francescano: Atti del XXXIV Convengo Internazionale Assisi, 5-7 Ottobre 2006

Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

Angelo Clareno Francescano: Atti del XXXIV Convengo Internazionale Assisi, 5-7 Ottobre 2006

Article excerpt

Angelo Clareno Francescano: Atti del XXXIV Convengo internazionale Assisi, 5-7 ottobre 2006. Edited by Enrico Menestò. [Atti dei Convengi della Società internazionale di studi francescani e del Centro interuniversitario di studi francescani. Nuova Serie, Voi. 17.] (Spoleto: Fondazione Centro italiano di studi sull'Alto Medioevo. 2007. Pp. x, 430. euro48,00 paperback. ISBN 978-8-879-88053-4.)

The annual Franciscan Studies Conference in Assisi reliably produces highquality conference proceedings on important subjects. No exception is the volume dedicated to Angelo Clareno (11343) whose Liber Chronicarum (c. 132Os) of Franciscan history, with its poverty controversies and persecution of "Spiritual" Franciscans, set a template for subsequent accounts.

The collection starts in earnest with Paolo Vian's "parallel lives" treatment of Angelo Clareno and Ubertino da Casale. Vian shows how two Spirituals could have opposing reactions to Popes Boniface VUl, Clement V, and John ???; the difference is explained by a general fight-or-flight approach to the world: The eremitical Angelo wanted to observe literally the Franciscan Rule outside the order, the mendicant Ubertino struggled to do so within it. David Burr scrutinizes Angelo 's commentary on the Rule with regard to the notion of obethence. Burr notes the irony that Angelo spent a "number of years . . . dodging his Franciscan superiors and at times the pope as well" (p. 30), but nevertheless emphasized obethence in his commentary. In fact, Angelo considered the Rule a divine revelation and thought that one must obey God rather than men. Felice Accrocca concentrates on the History of the Seven Tribulations of the Franciscan Order or Liber Chronicarum and skeptically considers G. L. Potestà's thesis about its redaction. Potestà hypothesized a twostep composition: The first redaction contained only six tribulations (c/.Job 5: 19: "In six tribulations he shall deliver you, and in the seventh, evil shall not touch you") and ended with Clement V in 1314. Angelo then revised his work during the turbulent pontificate of John ???, adding a seventh tribulation with a touch of evil. Accrocca finds this explanation too tidy and cautions against discarding the old single redaction theory. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.