Academic journal article The Spanish Journal of Psychology

Use of the "Mental Health Inventory - 5" with Portuguese 10-15 Years Old

Academic journal article The Spanish Journal of Psychology

Use of the "Mental Health Inventory - 5" with Portuguese 10-15 Years Old

Article excerpt

The present study describes the psychometric properties of the Portuguese version of the Mental Health Inventory-5 for use with young adolescents. A sample of 367 Portuguese students (aged 10-15 years) completed the Portuguese-language versions of Mental Health Inventory-5 (MHI-5; Berwick et al., 1991), Children's Hope Scale (CHS; Snyder et al., 1997), Students' Life Satisfaction Scale (SLSS; Huebner, 1991a), and Global Self-Worth Sub-scale (Harter, 1985). Analysis of readability, reliability (internal consistency and 1-year stability), factor structure, and criterion-related validity suggested that the MHI-5 can be appropriately used in this age group. Implications of the findings are discussed.

Keywords: early-adolescents, Mental Health Inventory-5, metric properties, positive constructs.

El presente estudio describe las propiedades psicométricas de la versión en portugués del Mental Health Inventory-5 para su uso con los jóvenes adolescentes. Una muestra de 367 estudiantes portugueses (10-15 años de edad) completaron la versión en portugués del Mental Health Inventory-5 (MHI-5; Berwick et al., 1991), Children's Hope Scale (CHS; Snyder et al., 1997), Students' Life Satisfaction Scale (SLSS; Huebner, 1991a), y Global Self-Worth Sub-scale (Harter, 1985). Análisis de la comprensión de la lectura, de la fiabilidad (consistencia interna y 1año de estabilidad), de la estructura factorial y de la validez relacionada con el criterio sugiere que el MHI-5 puede ser utilizado con este grupo de edad. Se analizan las implicaciones de los resultados.

Palabras clave: jóvenes adolescentes, Inventario de salud mental; propiedades métricas, variables positivas.

The evolution of the mental health conceptualization includes indicators that measure beyond a negative point to desirable levels of functioning and examine mental health in terms of traditional indicators of psychopathology (e.g., symptoms of anxiety and depression) as well as the presence of indicators of psychological well-being (e.g., feeling cheerful, interest in and enjoyment of life) (Ware, Snow, Kosinski, & Gandek, 1993). Psychological well-being items have the potential to expanding the scope of and improving the precision of mental health measurement by distinguishing among persons who are highly distressed (Veit & Ware, 1983).

Adolescence is a developmental period when individuals may be particularly vulnerable to the negative effects of stress and depressive symptoms (e.g. developmental challenges inherent to adolescence, such as puberty, school transitions and academic demands) (Hankin & Abramson, 2001; McNamara, 2000). Research on mental health indicators such as stress have been linked with aggression (Jaser et al., 2005), academic underachievement (Alva & de Los Reyes, 1999; Cunningham, Hurley, Foney, & Hayes, 2002), depression (Martin, Kazarian, & Breiter, 1995) and substance abuse (Chassin, Ritter, Trim, & King, 2003). Students lower on neuroticism and higher on conscientiousness, sense of coherence, extraversion, and optimism perceive their mental health to be better (Ebert, Tucker, & Roth, 2002). Specifically, hope and life satisfaction represent salient dimensions of individual adjustment and level of functioning. Mental health problems have been related with compromised life satisfaction (McKnight, Huebner, & Suldo, 2002) and hope is modestly and inversely related to mental health problems and psychopathology (Hagen, Myers, & Mackintosh, 2005; Snyder et al., 1997; Valle, Huebner, & Suldo, 2004). Self-esteem is an important and well established concept in the field of child and adolescent mental health. For example, low self-esteem has repeatedly been reported as a contributing factor to mental health problems including depression, anxiety, conduct/antisocial personality disorder, and suicidal ideation (Boden, Fergusson, & Horwood, 2008; Newbegin & Owens, 1996; Schroevers, Ranchor, & Sanderman, 2003). …

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