Academic journal article Nursing Education Perspectives

Renewed and New Recommendations for World Health: "Turning the World Upside Down"

Academic journal article Nursing Education Perspectives

Renewed and New Recommendations for World Health: "Turning the World Upside Down"

Article excerpt

International development becomes co-development, bringing together insights from each partner to influence health care among all participants.

RECENTLY, Nigel Crisp, former head of the largest health system in the world, the National Health Service in the United Kingdom (UK), presented what might be considered radical views on how the global community can achieve improvements in health. The foundations of Crisp's thesis are not new to nursing, but rather have formed the very core of our professional values, beliefs, and, often, our practices. They have direct relevance for nursing education and professional practice and were evident in this May's International Council of Nurses (ICN) conference in Malta.

Nurses throughout the world know that we have much to learn from each other, and that the developed nations could best improve their health care systems by adopting the models of primary health care practiced in developing countries. We have witnessed shared successes in collaborative education and research models with many examples of collaborative nursing education extending across country boundaries. Yet, Crisp's recommendations go a bit further, stretching our thinking and recommending changes in traditional practices.

Crisp's changes are reflected in language; international development becomes co-development, bringing together insights from each partner to influence health care among all participants. He also provides a view of health within a broad perspective of society and culture, and focuses on empowering individuals to assume responsibility for their own health and wellness. Again, these views are consistent with nursing knowledge, education, and professional practice. As nurse educators, we present the holistic view to our students and help them develop understanding of individuals and families within their communities. Our focus is on the cultural context of health and illness and the influences of context on individuals and families. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.