Academic journal article Journal of the International Academy for Case Studies

Mia Motors: The Arrival of a Foreign Multinational Firm into the U.S. Automobile Market

Academic journal article Journal of the International Academy for Case Studies

Mia Motors: The Arrival of a Foreign Multinational Firm into the U.S. Automobile Market

Article excerpt

CASE DESCRIPTION

The primary subject matter of this case concerns the entry of a Korean multinational firm into the U.S. Automobile market and the development of an enormous management challenge to not only coexist but to prosper in an industry with the hope for future growth in a market dominated by large multinational firms who also have similar aspirations of growth, profit and success in a turbulent market. The issue of international capital funding, that is obtaining the required implementation and operational funding to begin U.S. operations away from its home country, along with pricing of the firm's domestic and foreign public offerings, and possible use of American Depository Receipts (ADRs) to acquire the needed funding are central themes for the case evaluator and student. Further, the determination of appropriate methods for acquiring the necessary funding, while managing foreign exchange (forex) risk and the handling of SEC Rule 144A and other security choices, have significant impact on the success of the firm and are integral to the case. How should the automobile industry, the prudent American consumer and the American stock market accommodate this new Korean firm who must face major competitors, virtual giants in the U.S. auto world, specifically, the big three: Ford, GM and Chrysler? The case has a difficulty level of three, appropriate for first year graduate level. The case has both current and historical applicability for MBA students concentrating in corporate finance, international financial management, or multinational corporate entrepreneurial relations and serves as a pedagogically sound tool for applied market strategy by foreign multinational firms who similarly seek entry into and funding in the U.S. economy. It includes elements of the valuation processes used by American analysts and investors to determine the investment potential of those multinational manufacturing and service firms. The case is designed to be taught in three class hours and is expected to require 6-8 hours of outside preparation by students. Mia Motors is a fictitious firm and much of the company information provided in the case is included to enhance the case focus and present a pedagogical model with a range of international issues including the use of international corporate financing with ADRs and other financing methods by a firm who may have subsidiaries branching into foreign country operations while maintaining close direct support and supervision by parent firms from their countries of origin. The exercise of and use of international financial theory and concepts provide the basis for much of Mia's management strategy in addition to its entrepreneurial efforts within the case. Thus, any similarities noted between Mia Motors and other international firms are purely coincidental.

CASE SYNOPSIS

This case affords students an opportunity - from both strategic and financial points of view - to evaluate Mia Motors' decision to expand its operations outside Korea to the U.S.; to provide or obtain the funding necessary to establish and continue operations in U.S. public markets while simultaneously maintaining home country relationships and further consideration of expanding its assembly and manufacturing operations world-wide from a growth perspective. The approach of the case hinges on the analysis of two key areas: 1) the internal decisions made by the home office of Mia Motors located in Korea to assist its international subsidiary to obtain operational funding to enhance the unit's successful U.S. market entry and to better enable the operational rigors faced by the firm in a market composed of major players in the industry (Ford, General Motors and Chrysler and others) and 2) the effect and influence of multinational banking firms in providing the necessary operating capital for similar firms like Mia Motors, who may also be entering fully-integrated industries with a primary product. The product in the case is simply known as ""A Foreign" Car trade category which is widely known and accepted now. …

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