Academic journal article Journal of Singing

Letters to the Editor

Academic journal article Journal of Singing

Letters to the Editor

Article excerpt

Dear Dr. Sjoerdsma,

After reading Martin Spencer's letter to the editor concerning issues raised by Dr. Karen Wicklund [JOS 67, no. 5 (May/June 2011): 501-502] I would like humbly to add my two cents.

I agree with Mr. Spencer that the title of "singing voice" or "singing health" specialist (or any of their derivatives) is a self-styled moniker that is used loosely in some circles. Additionally, I agree that the SVS/SHS is not licensed to treat clinical disorders of the voice. However, many of us who choose to use the SVS designation do so after acquiring advanced training in this growing specialty, but realize not everyone will do so. I have completed coursework offered by Dr. Wicklund (author of Singing Voice Rehabilitation: A Guide for the Voice Teacher and Speech-Language Pathologist), training voice teachers to habilitate singers (under the direction of an ENT) who have disordered voices. I can personally attest to her high standards and highly selective acceptance into the program. (I showed proof of my training in voice pedagogy, voice disorders, advanced physics, and paramedic training prior to acceptance, although this degree of training is not required by all applicants.) Throughout the program, Dr. Wicklund stressed the role of the SVS as a vital member of the voice team and effectively drew the line between the legal responsibilities and duties of the SLP and SVS. Granted, this program is not a national credential; however, it does provide much needed training that sets a standard where no standard currently exists. …

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