Academic journal article Medium Aevum

Die Glossen Ekkeharts IV. Von St. Gallen Im Codex Sangallensis 621

Academic journal article Medium Aevum

Die Glossen Ekkeharts IV. Von St. Gallen Im Codex Sangallensis 621

Article excerpt

Heidi Eisenhut, Die Glossen Ekkeharts IV. von St. Gallen im Codex Sangallensis 621, Monasterium Sancti Galli, vol. 4 (St. Gallen: Verlag am Klosterhof, 2009). 497 pp.; 22 photos. ISBN 978-3-906616-90-2. CHF 98.00.

Ekkehard IV (c.980- after 1057), the monk of Sankt Gallen who is rather better known as the author of the Casus s. Galli and a Liber Benedictionum, is also responsible for a variable amount of predominantly Latin glossing in numerous Sankt Gallen manuscripts, including cod. Sang. 621, a ninth-century copy of Orosius' Historiae adversum paganos, which is the object of this study. The title of Heidi Eisenhut's book misleadingly suggests a much more Hmited field of enquiry than is actuaUy the case, for she approaches her target from afar and from different angles. Thus in the first two chapters the author considers the reception of the Historiae, focusing interestingly on its position in relation to other fundamental historiographical works from late antiquity, such as Rufinus' Latin translation of Eusebius' Historia ecclesiastica and Augustine's De civitate Dei, and then reviews the evidence for knowledge and use of Orosius' work in Sankt Gallen (and Reichenau), discussing in turn Walahfrid Strabo, Notker III, and of course Ekkehard IV himself. In the next chapter the perspective widens again, beyond the Bodensee region, to provide an overview of all the Historiae-tehted gloss material, ranging from excerpts of the text or lemmata therefrom in alphabetical glossaries to Hsts of glossae collectae and of course to textual glosses. This comprehensive catalogue, which also provides an opportunity for the author to raise and discuss critically a wide range of issues related to the nature, origin, and purpose of the different categories of glossing, will undoubtedly provide a very convenient starting point for anyone planning further work in the field. Chapters 4 and 5 are dedicated to the analysis of Cod. 621 and its glosses. The manuscript presents two main glossing hands, of which the latter (1113) has long been recognized as Ekkehard's. The author argues quite convincingly, however, that the earlier glossing hand (m2) should also be seen as Ekkehard's, a conclusion which may be reached not so much on palaeographical considerations alone, but rather taking into account the content of some of the glosses by m2, for example that on the astrolabe. …

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