Academic journal article Medium Aevum

Women and Writing, C.1340-C.1650: The Domestication of Print Culture

Academic journal article Medium Aevum

Women and Writing, C.1340-C.1650: The Domestication of Print Culture

Article excerpt

Women and Writing c.iß4o-c.i6yo: The Domestication of Print Culture, ed. Anne Lawrence-Mathers and Phillipa Hardman, York Medieval Press (Woodbridge: Boydell Press; Rochester, NY: Boydell and Brewer, 2010). ? + 238 pp.; 6 illustrations. ISBN 978-1-903 1- 5332- 1. £50.00/$ 9 5. 00. One of the first in a new series on manuscript culture in the British Isles, focusing on the transition from manuscript to print in relation to issues of gender. Essays discuss women as readers, translators, teachers, and writers. Following an introduction by Anne Lawrence-Mathers, Phillipa Hardman explores the role of late medieval mothers in educating their children, looking in particular at household miscellanies; Lawrence-Mathers analyses the scientific and household guidance offered women readers by sixteenth-century almanacs. Gemma Allen probes the context and influence of Lady Anne Bacon's 1 564 translation of the Apologia Ecclesiae Anglicanae. Alison Wiggins considers the evidence of early-modern female readers found in a 1550 print of Thynne's Chaucer, while Adam Smyth explores the place of women in commonplace-book culture. …

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