Academic journal article Framework

Charlie Is My Darling, Review, Variety, 1966

Academic journal article Framework

Charlie Is My Darling, Review, Variety, 1966

Article excerpt

Charlie, world- preemed [premiered] at the just concluded Mannheim fi lm festival, is the fi rst pic on Britain's Rolling Stones. Technically, it demonstrates what its creator, 29- year- old Peter Whitehead, describes as "the method of direct cinema." Although reviews on the outcome of this unconventional documentary will be varied, there is hardly any doubt that Charlie will stir interest. After all, the Rolling Stones are "no nobodies." Film gives a good insight into the behind- the- scenes life of this idolized beat group, has a good number of interesting shots and some funny moments, and in a way reveals what price the Stones have actually to pay for their popularity. As much as they may want them, there don't seem to be any dull moments for them outside their homes.

It is said that it was the success of Whitehead's Wholly Communion (incidentally, this fi lm was also at the Mannheim fest; it got one of the major awards there) documentary on the recital of beat poetry before 5,000 [this number varies; some sources say there were 7,000 in attendance] people at London's Albert Hall last summer, which led to the invitation by Andrew Oldham, manager of the Stones, to make a fi lm during the two- day tour of Ireland. The only conditions were said to be no tripods, no lights, one camera, two days, four concerts and no one knowing what would happen, fi lm was as much a happening as the unforeseen incidents that happen any day in the life of the Stones. …

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