Academic journal article Journalism History

Thirty-Second Democracy

Academic journal article Journalism History

Thirty-Second Democracy

Article excerpt

Thirty-Second Democracy. New York: First Run Films 1997. 0:48.

In Thirty-Second Democracy, veteran producer David Vainola enters the domain of the political media with a documentary probably of little use to those who specialize in that area. Vainola's film, which draws largely on the recent history of the political media, is primarily a treatise on what is wrong with the political system in North America, specifically Canada. His conclusion: television commercials. The central question the film asks is: Do we elect our candidates or do we buy them? Therein lies the problem, Vainola proposes. "Buying" and "electing," he says, should have become opposites, and yet they are not in the modern world.

If hy "we" Vainola means the viewing audience, there is some question as to whether we select candidates solely upon the weight of their television advertisements. Even Vainola concedes that more than TV is involved in electing candidates. While the complexity of the political media has been a topic of much media history, the case in point here is a Canadian candidate followed throughout the film. This candidate has slicklyproduced, "sincere" spots and she is the heavy frontrunner. Yet despite all this she fails in her bid. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.