Academic journal article The Geographical Bulletin

A Note from the Editor, and Some Unconventional Grammar

Academic journal article The Geographical Bulletin

A Note from the Editor, and Some Unconventional Grammar

Article excerpt

First of all, an apology is due to the authors of an article in the November 2010 issue. For Richard Shaker and TaIy Drezner s article "A New Technique for Predicting the Sky- View Factor for Urban Heat Island Assessment," we inadvertently reversed the order of the two authors; Richard Shaker should be listed as first author. We've posted a corrected version on EBSCO and ProQuest.

Secondly, our online archives of old issues of The Geographical Bulletin back to Volume 1 in 1970 are now complete - check them out at http://www.gammathetaupsilon. org/geogr aphical-bulletin-index.html. Special thanks are due to Catherine Lockwood, Jim Snaden, and Thomas Vaughn who tracked down the missing issues.

And now for something completely different. As Fm sure you've noticed, the English language, as flexible and fluid as it is, has a glaring flaw - namely, the lack of a third-person singular pronoun that is gender-neutral. If a writer needs to refer to an unknown individual, she must either use a gender-specific word (thus sowing potential confusion and/ or sexism), or he/she is stuck with a clunky construction that has all the grace of tax form instructions.

Imagine my delight, then, upon discovering Patricia T O 'Conner and Stewart Kellerman's "On Language" column in the New York Times Magazine from July 26, 2009, entitled "AllPurpose Pronoun: The Search for an Anybody Who's Everybody."1 Turns out, the English language came up with a solution a long time ago - simply use "they" as a generic third-person pronoun. …

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