Academic journal article et Cetera

Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other

Academic journal article et Cetera

Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other

Article excerpt

Sherry Turkic. Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other. New York: Basic Books, 2011.

In the late twentieth century, Neil Postman, in his book Technopoly, contended that if we are not vigilant in our understanding and use of technology there will come a point where we will be enslaved by it. At the dawn of the new millennium, MIT professor Sherry Turkle, in her book Alone Together (the third volume in a trilogy that explores the relationship between human beings and technology), makes a similar argument.

Turkle maintains that while texting, e-mailing, and social networking have allowed people the opportunity to communicate more with each other they are often connecting in a superficial sense; getting closer to their machines and further from their fellow life forms. People sit together in restaurants and in family dining rooms and rather than speaking face-to-face with the persons opposite them they're on their BlackBerries or other smartphones interacting virtually. As for the idea of friendship in the twenty-first century, Turkle cites a survey noting that, despite all the "friending" that's going on at Facebook (which provides the illusion of companionship), Americans say they have fewer friends than ever before. …

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