Academic journal article Base Ball

Blood and Base Ball

Academic journal article Base Ball

Blood and Base Ball

Article excerpt

Before the Civil War, the most popular outdoor activity in New York City may have been fighting. The prize ring was popular, but rioting in streets and public squares attracted more participants. In fact, there was little distinction between professional pugilists and gang brawlers. Heavyweights like John Morrissey were also employed as "shoulder-hitters" by political gangs like the Empire Club, run by Captain Isaiah Rynders, a leading Democrat, or the Short Boys of Bill "the Butcher" Poole, hero of the Know-Nothings.

Rynders and his crew delighted in attacking abolitionist gatherings. In May 1850 they showed up in force at an antislavery convention at the Broadway Tabernacle. Speaker Frederick Douglass defused the attack by inviting a racist orator to share the platform. To the argument that Negroes were a kind of ape, Douglass, whose father was probably a slave-owner, responded:

"Captain Rynders, do you think I am a monkey?"

"Oh no," replied Rynders, "you are half a white man."

"Then I am half man and half monkey?"

"Yes."

"And half brother to Captain Rynders?"

With the audience "united in laughter and applause," Douglass spoke his piece. It was a short-lived triumph, however. Threats of mayhem truncated the conference and, several days later, while walking with two white women in Battery Park, Douglass was assaulted.1

A year later, on May 27, 1851, the Elysian Fields in Hoboken was the scene of what the Brooklyn Eagle described as

... one of the most earnest and angry promiscuous fights that has ever occurred in this country. The Germans of this city, with their families, assembled in large numbers in Hoboken, for the celebration of their Maifest. Scarcely two hours had elapsed when they were set upon by a party of rascals called "Short Boys."

At first the Germans were disposed to avoid a conflict, but finding it impossible to do so, they sallied out against them, and drove them to the Elysian Fields. The Short Boys took refuge in a house kept by one McCarthy, which was attacked by the Germans, and greatly injured. McCarthy, in defense of himself and his house, shot two of the Germans with a double barreled gun, killing them, it is said.2

Fortunately, this incident did not disrupt the plans of the tenants of the Club Room at McCarty's Colonnade House. The Knickerbocker Base Ball Club had been challenged to play a home-and-home series by the recently formed Washington Club. After a promising start, the Knickerbockers had been, in the words of D. L. Adams, in "pursuit of pleasure under difficulties." "There was then no rivalry," he recalled, "as no other club was formed until 1850, and during these five years baseball had a desperate struggle for existence."3

It happened that the first match, on June 3, was an away game at the Red House Grounds in Harlem. Down 7-3 after two innings, the Knickerbockers rallied to win 21-11. Two weeks later, the clubs met for a thrilling return match at the Elysian Fields, with the home club managing a 22-20 victory. As usual, "an entertainment was given after play at McCarty's Hotel."

Since 1844, the waiters at the Colonnade House had been privy to the world of the New York and Knickerbocker Base Ball clubs, had watched their game develop in the neighboring fields, and were a fixture at the convivial dinners when plays and points were reviewed. The Stevens family, which owned the Hoboken grounds, like many upperclass New Yorkers employed colored help. Michael McCarty, born in Ireland, employed his countrymen as barkeepers but conformed to the expectations of his gentlemen patrons by hiring black servants (including live-in waiter Jeremiah Jackson).

This link between early baseball and black New Yorkers was soon severed, however. On March 7, 1852, the Brooklyn Eagle reported that "Mr. McCarty of the Elysian Fields Hotel, was accidentally shot and killed by his own act yesterday." Sarah McCarty, 27 years old with four children under the age of nine, was leftin charge. …

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