Academic journal article Journal of Biblical Literature

A Rejoinder concerning 1 Samuel 1:11

Academic journal article Journal of Biblical Literature

A Rejoinder concerning 1 Samuel 1:11

Article excerpt

Michael Carasik, in his article "Why Did Hannah Ask for 'Seed of Men'?" (JBL 129, no. 3 [2010]: 433-36), refers to the expression My#n) (rz in 1 Sam 1:11 as "difficult . . . an artifact" (p. 435) and as an "absurd phrase" (p. 436), which leads him to conclude that it served as "a kind of Tiqqun Soferim" for the original Myhl) (rz. I would like to note here that the phrase is none of the above since it has clear-cut semantic and philological analogues in Hebrew, Aramaic, and Akkadian, all referring to human offspring-analogues that heretofore have not been cited in biblical commentaries. In Hebrew, one can call attention to Jer 31:27, Md) (rz, in the context of the future procreation of humankind; in Aramaic, to Dan 2:43, )#n) (rz, referring there to interdynastic marriage. In particular, examples can be cited from Mesopotamian literature, where the expression zer amiluti (= My#n) (rz) appears with the explicit meaning of a "child/human being": "May she [the goddess] Nintu . . . not allow a child to be born among his people" (Code of Hammurabi LI:48);1 "Aruru helped him [Marduk] to create every human being" (CT 13, 36:20-21;2 cf. 16, 20:943); "Adapa, a human being" (Proceedings of the Society of Biblical Archaeology 16, 275:12);4 "No human being must see him" (ABL 128:10). …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.