Academic journal article Kuram ve Uygulamada Egitim Bilimleri

Opinions of High School Administrators on Teachers' Organizational Dissent Behaviors

Academic journal article Kuram ve Uygulamada Egitim Bilimleri

Opinions of High School Administrators on Teachers' Organizational Dissent Behaviors

Article excerpt

Abstract

The purpose of this research is to find out the reasons that trigger teachers' dissent, how the dissenters behave and the effects of organizational dissent on the teachers, administrators, and the school. The study was conducted with the qualitative methods. 15 school administrators working in five different schools located in Mamak District in Ankara participated in the search. The data were collected with the semi-structured interview form and analyzed with the content and descriptive analysis methods. For the purpose of presenting the data, the frequencies of the administrators' opinions were tabled and also administrators' views were described with the direct quotations. Eventually, it has been seen that the basic reason that triggers the teachers' dissent behavior is official work that is given by their administrators. Another result is that dissenters commonly minimize their relations with their administrators. School administrators also think that they commonly show tolerance to the dissenters and their attitude toward them is positive. On the other hand, they consider the organizational dissent as a factor that affects their comfort negatively. And lastly they think that organizational dissent cause destructive results at school.

Key Words

Organizational Dissent, Whistle Blowing, Pedagogy of Dissent.

Organizational democracy has been extensively investigated in the organizational literature in the last decades (Cheney, 1995; Chiles & Zorn, 1995; Dachler & Wilpert, 1978; Derber & Schwartz, 1983; Kassing, 1997a; Marshall & Stohl, 1993; Vredenburgh & Brender, 1993). Organizational dissent as being one of the basic indicators of democracy is an important variable in diagnosing organizational problems as well (Kassing, 2002; Shahinpoor & Matt, 2007). Similarly, some writers suggest that organizational dissent may contribute to organizational success and increase the job satisfaction of workers (Hegstrom, 1990; Redding, 1985; Stanley, 1981). Organizational dissent may also result in negative effects including organizational conflict and violence (Shahinpoor & Matt, 2007). The term "dissent" has Latin roots. In Latin, dis means apart, and sentire means feelings. Thus, dissent means 'feeling apart' (Kassing, 1997b). Organizational dissent has two parts; one of which is disagreement and the other part is to articulate disagreement with different ways inside or outside of organization (Ardogan, 2004; Kassing & DiCioccio, 2004; Redding, 1985; Türk Dil Kurumu [TDK], 2010). Therefore dissent can be defined as "particular form of employee voice that involves the expression of disagreement or contradictory opinions about organizational practices and policies" (Kassing, 2002, p. 189). There are some organizational events which trigger the organizational dissent including employee treatment, organizational change, decision making, inefficiency, role-responsibility, resources, ethics, performance evaluation, and preventing harm (Graham, 1986; Kassing, 2001; Kassing & Armstrong, 2002). There are several ways of expressing dissent. The most common ones are (i) whistle-blowing (Aktan, 2006; Jubb, 1999), (ii) articulated dissent (Cannings, 1992; Farrell & Rusbult, 1992; Kassing, 2000; Kassing & Armstrong, 2001; Kassing & Avtgis, 1999, 2001), (iii) latent dissent (Farrell & Rusbult, 1992) and, (iv) displaced dissent (Kassing, 1998). Studies showed close relationship between various organizational variables and organizational dissent (Avtgis, Thomas- Maddox, Taylor, & Patterson, 2007; Goodboy, Chory, & Dunleavy, 2008; Kassing, 2000; Kassing & DiCioccio, 2004; Kassing & McDowel, 2008; Payne, 2007; Sprague & Ruud, 1988). And also, some other studies have concentrated on the possible effects of dissent (Graham, 1986; Hegstrom, 1990). The dissent literature in educational settings can be classified as political (Chisholm, 1999; Cliggett & Wyssmann, 2009; Favela, 2010; Kirk, 2009; Murillo & Ronconi, 2004) and pedagogical (Gordon, 2008; MacKinnon, 2000; McMurray, 2007; Mulcahy & Irwin, 2008). …

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