Academic journal article Journal of Comparative Family Studies

Emerging Adulthood in Israeli Families: Individual-Social Tasks and Emotional-Relational Challenges

Academic journal article Journal of Comparative Family Studies

Emerging Adulthood in Israeli Families: Individual-Social Tasks and Emotional-Relational Challenges

Article excerpt

INTRODUCTION

The majority of youths between their late teens and mid-twenties express the feeling that they are past adolences but have not yet entered adaulthood (e.g., Arnett, 1998, 2004; Raizle, 2006). Arnett (2000) termed this stage of development "emerging adulthood" and characterized it by "change and exploration of life possibilities and gradually [arriving] at more enduring choices in loeve, work and worldviews" (Arnett, 2000; p. 479). Following Blos (1967), who introduced the "second separation-individual process," Levinson (1978) referred to this age as "the novice phase" and described its two main developement tasks. One is the shedding of old habits and relinquishing of practical and emotional dependencies; the second entails exploring, experimenting, and experiencing new directions and responsibilities. Following Levinson, varicos theorists and researchers (e.g., Arnett, 2001, 2007b; Bocknek & Perna, 1994; Gureviz-Stem, 2004; Mayseless & Scharf, 2003; Seginer & Noynan, 2005) noted three life domains implicated in maturation processes: (a) personal development, which involves feeling of competence and mastery, developing an enduring set of "values, self-integrity, future orientation, subjective feeling of maturity, and further differentiation from the family of origin; (b) social relations, which include social involvement and feelings of communality, cooperation, and competitiveness; (c) social tasks, which refer to meeting social expectations by making commitments to career and to romantic relationships, exhibiting a certain degree of economic independence, and leaving the parental home for a separate residence.

While emerging adulthood was first recognized as a distinctive life stge in western culture, researchers typically focused on its demographic and scciolcgical variables (e.g., Goldscheider & Goldscheider, 1999; O'Connor ,Thorpe, Dunn, Golding, & the ALSPAC Study Team, 1999; Sherrod, 1996). More recent studies, however, focus on the psychological and emotional aspects of the emerging adult (e.g., Arnett, 2007b; Coté, 2006; Galambod, Barker, & Krahn, 2006; Masten, Oloradvic & Burt, 2006; Schulenberg & Zarrett, 2006). Some researchers have tested the relationships between the emerging adult's personal characteristics and early chilhood experiences, on one hand, and attachnent patterns on the other (e.g. , Bernier, Lacse & Whipple, 2005; Roberts, O'Donnell, & Robins, 2004); Others focus on family characteristics, including the parent-adolescent relationship, and their effect on the young adult's adjustment to independence (e.g., Allen, Hauser, O'Connor & Bell, 2002; Masten et al., 2004; Noack & Buhl, 2004; Rusconi, 2004). However, regardless of the focus of their study, most researchers and theorists addressing this subject agree that the transition to adulthood is not only an individual process but encompasses the entire family.

Clearly, the process of differentiating from the family of origin challenges the family system by imposing new developmental tasks that call for a series of practical and emotional adjustments (Aquilino, 2006; Amett, 2007a.: Aylmer, 1988; Bloom, 1988; Hitching, Natelle, & Ristow, 1999; Lewis & Lin, 1996) . Both parents and youths must lock for new meaning in their relationship and for ways to allow the youths to reach functional and emotional autonomy Functional autonomy, vhich refers mainly to the individual social tasks, is only one aspect of a successful emerging-adulthood process. Emotional autonomy, vhich enables the youth to create an independent life within a meaningful positive relationship with his launding parents, is equally important (Bartle-Haring & Sabatelli, 1998; Ciorelli and Martin, 2004; Gavazzi, Sabatelli & Reese-Weber, 1999).

According to the systemic approach to the family, family dyramics and the functioning of each family member are related. The systemic approach addresses the entire family as the unit of observation, in which each interaction simultaneously influences and is influenced by all ether interactions. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.