Academic journal article Medium Aevum

The Munich Computus: Text and Translation. Irish Computistics between Isidore of Seville and the Venerable Bede and Its Reception in Carolingian Times, Sudhoffs Archiv: Beiheft

Academic journal article Medium Aevum

The Munich Computus: Text and Translation. Irish Computistics between Isidore of Seville and the Venerable Bede and Its Reception in Carolingian Times, Sudhoffs Archiv: Beiheft

Article excerpt

Immo Warntjes, The Munich Computus: Text and Translation. Irish Computistics between Isidore of Seville and the Venerable Bede and its Reception in Carolingan Times, Sudhoffs Archiv: Beiheft 59 (Stuttgart: Steiner, 2010). ccxxi + 402 pp. ISBN 978-3-51 5- 09701-7. euro89.00. The Latin treatise here printed for the first time survives in a single early ninth-century manuscript from the monastery of SL Emmeram in Regensburg, now Munich, BSB, CIm 1445 6, fols 8G-40G. On internal evidence it has been dated to AD 71 8-1 9 and includes some computistic material from AD 689. It survives with other computistica! texts and some annals from SL Emmeram that attracted the attention of Dom Jean Mabillon in 1683. The interest of the treatise has been known to specialists in the computas since the work of Bruno Krusch and Bartholomew McCarthy in the nineteenth century, who recognized its Irish origin. It has been supposed that the exemplar came from Ireland in the eighth century, and it was copied in Germany by someone not sufficiently well acquainted with the technicalities of computistica! language to avoid mistakes. Immo Warntjes has provided a massive edition, explaining its approach in every detail and seizing every available means to understand the eighth-century texL Incorrect readings are corrected by conjecture and by reference to other materials used by the author or at least deriving from the same scientific contexL Four layers of apparatus set out (i) points relating to the reading of the text, (2) sources, (3) comparable texts, and (4) discussion of passages by modern authorities. The plain text runs to about fifty pages, but the copious commentary and an English translation account for the bulk of the edition (pp. 2-317), and the complexity of the layout has occasioned some nearly blank pages (such as pp. 4of.). Forty-two headings divide the text in the manuscript, but these thin out after the middle, and the editor has added a further twenty-six headings, some of which are taken from texts that may have served as the writer's source, others are editorial, and the continuous roman numbering is editorial One might object that these should not be intruded in the same species of angle-bracket used for restorations of the writer's sense. …

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