Academic journal article Rural Educator

From the Editor

Academic journal article Rural Educator

From the Editor

Article excerpt

Welcome to the Winter2012 issue of the Rural Educator. The articles in this edition cover a spectrum of rural locations including Alabama, Mississippi, Texas, and Australia. Topics in this issue range from the effects of proactive behavioral support systems, analyzing post-secondary expectations of work-bound rural students, strategies to increase the college-going rates for rural students to pre-service teacher curricula focusing on rural education and teacher preparation to work with children with autism.

Ruiz, Ruiz, and Sherman's three-year longitudinal study demonstrates the effectiveness of the Texas Behavior Support Initiative (TBIS) in a rural Texas middle school. Analyzing discipline referral data from all 7th and 8th grade students enrolled in middle school during the years of study, the researchers noted that with proactive behavior supports and TBIS in place, referrals decreased 53%, thus indicating the effectiveness of the program.

Hutchins, Meece, Byun, and Farmer examined data from a national survey in order to explore the post-secondary expectations and aspirations of work-bound rural youth. The data, complied from 7,945 rural youth in grades 9th- 12th demonstrated the majority of these rural youth plan on attending a college of some sort, even if they must work while attending college. The findings also note that students who are solely work-bound tend to come from families who have suffered economic hardship or whose parents/guardians do not hold post-secondary expectations for these students.

King examined the perceptions of leaders of grant-supported projects aimed at increasing the college-going rate of high school students in rural Appalachian counties in Mississippi to determine which factors they felt most influenced the college-going rate, parental participation in school activities, and commumty participation. Analysis of the leaders' responses to questions related to these items showed that college visits and ACT preparation workshops were perceived as having the greatest impact on increasing the college-going rate at the schools. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.