Academic journal article International Education Studies

Senior Secondary School Science Teachers in Delta and Edo States Conceptualization about the Nature of Science

Academic journal article International Education Studies

Senior Secondary School Science Teachers in Delta and Edo States Conceptualization about the Nature of Science

Article excerpt

Abstract

The major purpose of this study was to find out the conceptions of science teachers about the nature of science. To guide this study, four research questions were asked and four hypotheses tested. The design of the study was descriptive survey and instrument used for data collection was a 22 item questionnaire. The sample of the study consisted of 400 science teachers drawn from senior secondary schools in Edo and Delta states. The data collected were analyzed with simple percentages and Chi square statistics. The major findings of the study included: (i) higher percentage of science teachers selected options which agreed with traditionalist's view on NOS; (ii) of the 22 items, in17 of them a higher proportion of science teachers conceived science from the traditionalist's view as against 5 for the constructivist view; (iii) a significant difference between the proportions of science teachers who opted for either traditionalist's or constructivist's view in all items except item 11; (iv) non-significant difference between the proportion of male and female science teachers on conception of science from the traditionalist's view; (v) significant differences in the proportions of male and female science teachers only in items 6,8,9 and 12 on the conception of science from the constructivist's view; (vi) non-significant difference in the proportions of urban and rural science teachers on conception of science from the traditionalist's view while significant differences were found between them only in items 2,6,10,12 and 17 on constructivist's view; and (vii) non-significant difference in the proportion of NCE, B.Sc (Ed) and B.Sc holders on conceptions of science from the traditionalist's view in all items except in item 17 while significant differences were found between them only in items 4,9,17 and 20 on constructivist's view. It is concluded that this trend in the conception of NOS can only be reversed through a deliberate science teacher preparatory curricula reform to include elements of constructivism.

Keywords: Conceptualization, Science, Teacher, Nature, Proportion

1. Introduction

1.1 Background of Study

Reforms in science education emphasize teaching science for all with the sole and ultimate purpose of developing scientific literacy. In this light, science teachers must go beyond simply teaching science as a body of knowledge. Today's teachers are challenged to engage students in a broader view of science, one that addresses the development of scientific knowledge and the way nature of the knowledge itself is (National Research Council, 1996). This implies that science teachers are encouraged and mandated to teach about the nature of science.

The role of science education in the socio-economic development of the societies and nations hardly needs any augments or discussions (Iqbal, Azam, & Rana, 2009) . They noted that it is because of this realization that science education has found a secured place in school curricula in almost every country around the world, particularly since the last two decades. Iqbal et al (2009), still maintained that the modern science curricula in various countries of the world, do not solely focus on developing the understanding of science concepts in students. It encompasses a wide variety of goals. Ajaja (2009a) for example, identified four major objectives for teaching science in Nigeria. These include:

(i) provision of basic training skills in scientific investigation;

(ii) provision of basic scientific literacy for everyday living;

(iii) provision of the basic skills and attitudes necessary for technological take-offand development; and

(iv) to stimulate and enhance the creativity of the child.

However, recent science curricula reforms in developed countries, have put added emphases on developing students' understanding about the nature of science (American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAS), 1990; and National Research Council (NRC), 1996). …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.