Academic journal article International Journal of Psychological Studies

The Relationship between Perceived Organizational Justice and OCBs with Consider Moderating Role of Equity Sensitivity: Some Cultural Implications

Academic journal article International Journal of Psychological Studies

The Relationship between Perceived Organizational Justice and OCBs with Consider Moderating Role of Equity Sensitivity: Some Cultural Implications

Article excerpt

Abstract

Perceived organizational justice is an important factor for prediction of various aspects of OCBs. This research investigates the extent to which equity sensitivity moderates the relationship between perceived organizational justice and OCBs. It was hypothesized that distributive, procedural, informational and interpersonal justice are related to OCBs (helping behavior, civic virtue, and sportsmanship) and equity sensitivity has been moderate these relationships. Research sample group were 123 employees of a petrochemical company in Iran. The moderated hierarchical regression analysis indicated that equity sensitivity moderates the relationship between perceived distributive organizational justice with civic virtue and sportsmanship. That is, in entitled group (and no in equity sensitive or benevolent groups) distributive justice positively and significantly related to civic virtue and sportsmanship (P<0.05). Also results indicated that equity sensitivity moderates the relationship between perceived procedural organizational justice and sportsmanship. That is, in an equity sensitive group (and no in entitled or benevolent groups) procedural justice positively and significantly related to sportsmanship (P<0.05).

Keywords: perceived organizational justice, OCBs, equity sensitivity

1. Introduction

Nowadays organizations for succession need employees who engage in extra-role behaviors such as organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs) (Chien, 1988). During recent decades OCBs has become one of the most important variable at workplace researches (Asgari, Silong, Ahmad & Samah, 2008). Historically, OCBs defined as discretionary behaviors that are not explicitly recognized by organization, but enhance the organizational performance by contributing to its social and psychological environment (Asgari et al, 2008). In essence, it could be said that OCBs are behaviors in which employees engage in them beyond their formal role requirements (Chien, 1988). The empirical findings suggest that OCBs are related with many individual and organization-level constructs such as organizational performance and effectiveness (Paille, 2009). Three dimensions of OCBs are helping behaviors, sportsmanship, and civic virtue (Organ & Konovsky, 1989). Helping behaviors is being helpful to coworkers or other people with little interest in being rewarded for one's efforts. Sportsmanship is refraining from complaining about trivial matters, and civic virtue is responsible participation in the social life of the organization such as staying up-to-date with important issues of the organization (Miao & Kim, 2010). One variable that could be possibly linked to OCBs is the perceived organizational justice (Organ & Moorman, 1993; Podsakoff, MacKenzie, Paine & Bachrach, 2000). In previous researches, researchers have used perceived organizational justice dimensions as antecedents of OCBs. The social exchange and equity theories suggest that OCBs are social responses to supervisors' and/or coworkers' behavior as well as a possible reaction of the individual to the behavior of his or her superior or to other motivation -based mechanisms in the workplace. Although studies have demonstrated that OCBs has a positive relationship with organizational performance (Podsakoffet al, 2000), but most OCBs studies have been conducted in the western countries (Lievens & Anseel, 2004; Paille, 2009). In past decade, OCBs has been studied in other countries such as in Iran (Golparvar & Rafizadeh, 2009). Research on OCBs in other countries is very important since cultural factors (Miao & Kim, 2010) may affect the relationship between perceptual constructs such as perceived organizational justice and OCBs.

2. Literature Review

2.1 Perceived Organizational Justice and OCBs

Organizational justice is a perceptual variable and refers to the presence of justice in distribution of outcomes, implementation of decisions and interaction between authority figures with employees in the organization (Colquitt, 2001). …

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