Academic journal article Iranian Journal of Public Health

Transformation of Health Care in Mainland China: Hospital Violator

Academic journal article Iranian Journal of Public Health

Transformation of Health Care in Mainland China: Hospital Violator

Article excerpt

Current health-care system reforms in Mainland China are the unintended consequences of economic reforms that have exerted direct and indirect. China has had one of the world's fastest growing economies. However, healthcare development in China is far behind its economic growth. One effect of reform has been an increase in the frequency of malignant medical disputes (hospital violator), as more and more patients choose violence to safeguard their rights. Doctors are often victims of terrible violence (1-2).

There were 9831 incidents of serious medical dispute in Mainland China in 2006, 5519 medical workers were injured (3).The medical dispute incidence is increasing by 22.6% annually. Chinese Medical Association survey showed that more than three quarters of the hospital's staffwould be hurt by patients after medical disputes (3). Especially, the hired hospital violators' appear provoking those tense situation. In the past nine months, more than a dozen doctors were beaten to death or disability. Some doctors even came from the large ones such as Beijing Tong Ren Hospital and Xin Hua Hospital of Shang Hai Jiao Tong University.

China doctors, who used to be worshipped as "angels in white," are now known as "wolf in white eyes". Some doctors accept red envelopes and receive financial kickbacks from drug companies, resulting in a decline in prestige fell. This has become an open secret in the medical industry. Additionally, many patients believe that hospitals conspire to increase charges by providing unnecessary examinations and treatments. The media certainly have an important role in provoking tension between doctors and patients. Media subjective reports make the question of "expensive medical bills and difficult access to quality medical services" an issue of hospitals and doctors.

Of course, the above is only presentative. See through the appearance to perceive the essence: Mainland China's public health spending accounts for 4.58% of gross national product in 2007, ranking in 188 of 191 countries (comes fourth from the bottom) (4). Although the trend shows that an increasing proportion of total healthcare expenditure has been funded by the government since 2001, the government paid only 20.3% of the expenditure in 2007 (5). In the same period the United States and the World Health Organization's standard are 13.9% and 5%, respectively (6). After economic reforms, the public hospitals ( run by the government) now receive very limited financial support from the government, requiring hospitals to generate income to cover costs. …

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