Academic journal article Military Review

Sharing Secrets with Stalin: How the Allies Traded Intelligence, 1941-1945

Academic journal article Military Review

Sharing Secrets with Stalin: How the Allies Traded Intelligence, 1941-1945

Article excerpt

SHARING SECRETS WrIT STALIN: How the Allies Traded Intelligence, 1941-1945 by Bradley F. Smith. 307 pages. University Press of Kansas, Lawrence. KS. 1996. $35.00.

While most people are familiar with World War II's Lend-Lease Program, few are aware that Great Britain and the United States exchanged intelligence with the Soviet Union. Bradley F. Smith, an experienced writer and history instructor, states that the Allies began exchanging information about Germany and Japan after Germany's Operation Barbarossa in 1941. Using archive and recently released materials, Smith portrays these exchanges as fluctuating for a variety of reasons. Lacking necessary technological resources, the British were hampered in obtaining information about German equipment, codes and orders of battle (OBs). The Soviets seemed to view Britain as a weak player on the world scene with few material items to share. However, the Soviets viewed the United States as an emerging power with the economic strength to produce enough to share.

The book revolves around OBs and wireless intercepts-the "Y" services. The Allies were hesitant to share what they acquired from the airwaves for fear of disclosing too much. The Soviets pushed for more "Y" materials; the British and Americans pushed for more OB information. The United States openly shared information gained via the airwaves in the Pacific, but the Soviets were not interested in that theater until the European situation eased. …

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